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Eric
Eric, Automotive Repair Shop Manager
Category: Ford
Satisfied Customers: 24044
Experience:  Automotive Repair Shop Manager, Technician
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1999 ford contour SE: V6..stall..accelerator..The check engine light

Resolved Question:

The 1999 Ford Countour SE, V6, 2.5 L car would stall and turn off when I was driving, unless I would put my foot on the accelerator. The check engine light was on. This problem became more pronounced over time and seemed to have worsened when the car would be sitting cold, too long. I took it to Ford mechanic and they replaced the IMRC and o2 sensors replaced (no reading from O2 sensors). They also said that there was a vacuum leak in the lower intake manifold + hose, since the O2 sensors were saying that the engine was running lean in Bank 2. And that it would need replacement (parts were not available)

Yesterday, the car would not start, when i tried to restart it to return home from a friend's, after having had driven it 20 miles only 10 minutes before. The engine would turn but it would not catch. I had fuel in the car. I had even let the car sit for a day, in case of water in the tank. But So it was towed to the dealership. Apparently, they said that the fuel pump is not working and needs replacement. No electrical output from the part.

It was strange, when I was driving the car, there was a moment, when I felt like I couldn't push on the brakes. This was the point when the check engine light came on again.

Does it sound like the fuel pump. And if so...should i get the full fuel pump assembly?

And does a bad fuel pump/fuel pump assmbly, have anything to do with the vacuum leak in the lower intake manifold which was causing a reading to the O2 sensors to indicate, "lean conditions in bank 1 and 2"? And as for the IMRC, it must have something to do with vacuum leak in the the lower intake manifold, no?

Thank you.
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Ford
Expert:  Eric replied 3 years ago.
Hi,

Ok, you have a few different issues going on.

The brake pedal feeling like it wouldnt push down any is related to the vacuum leak. The power assist is run by engine vacuum. this means that you will intermittently lose power assist and thereby have a hard brake pedal until the engine vacuum problem is repaired.
Intake leaks are fairly common on this engine. The IMRC most likely failed due to the vacuum leak and is why it was replaced.

Now, to the fuel pump. This failure has nothing to do with the vacuum leak. The fuel pump doesnt operate off of engine vacuum as it is an electric fuel pump and is located inside the gas tank itself.

As to replacement, I would go ahead and go with the whole fuel pump/fuel sender assembly and make sure it is a Ford Motorcraft part and not aftermarket. Aftermarket fuel pumps generally last only a year or so before you wind up replacing it again. although more expensive, a factory fuel pump will last much longer and therefore be less expensive in the long run
Customer: replied 3 years ago.
<p>I see. And do fuel pumps usually go out on a ford contour that often?</p><p> </p><p>I heard this was not very common. Because if it is so then I would go with the used fuel pump. And would it be very hard to do this work myself? The dealership is asking in the excess of 700.00 for the part and labor.</p><p>If possible, I'd like to get my hands on this part and do the work myself.</p><p>Not to mention, I need to go in there and replace the lower intake manifold, (due to leak).  Because it is a discontinuted part, it would have to be an aftermarket part. </p>
Expert:  Eric replied 3 years ago.
Hi,

Although not common, I have replaced a few in my time. It isnt too difficult to replace. You remove the rear seat cushion and there is an access panel to remove to get to the fuel pump. Below are directions:

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Relieve the fuel pressure using the following procedure:
    1. Open the fuel tank filler cap to vent off pressure in the tank.
  3. Remove the rear seat cushion.
  4. Remove the plastic grommet from the floor pan.
  5. Disconnect the fuel pump electrical harness.
  6. Disconnect the fuel lines from the fuel pump by compressing the tabs on both sides of each nylon push connect fitting and easing the fuel line off of the fuel pump.



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 4: View of fuel pump fittings through the floorpan



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 5: Remove the locking ring from the fuel pump sender with a special wrench such as Fuel Tank Sender Wrench D84P-9275-A

  1. Using Fuel Tank Sender Wrench D84P-9275-A or equivalent, turn the fuel pump locking ring counterclockwise to loosen the ring.

A drift punch or a screwdriver or other tool can be used to disengage the fuel pump locking ring, the special tool is not required.

  1. Remove the fuel pump locking ring.
  2. Remove the fuel pump being careful not to damage the fuel gauge sending unit.
  3. Place a shop towel over the opening in the fuel tank to prevent dirt from contaminating the fuel.

To install:
  1. Remove the shop towel over the opening in the fuel tank and clean the groove for the fuel pump seal. Be careful not to allow dirt to enter the fuel tank.
  2. Apply a light coat of grease onto a new O-ring seal and install into the groove of the fuel tank.
  3. Carefully install the fuel pump into the tank to prevent damage to the fuel gauge sender or the fuel pick-up filter.

It is recommended that the in-line fuel filter be replaced whenever a fuel pump is being replaced.

  1. Ensure that the flange of the fuel pump mounting plate is located properly in its keyway and that the O-ring has not shifted out of position.
  2. Keep a light downward pressure on the fuel pump while installing the fuel pump locking retainer ring.
  3. Install the ring ensuring that all of the locking tabs are under the fuel tank lock ring tabs. Turn the ring clockwise finger-tight.
  4. Install the fuel tank sender wrench or equivalent, over the retainer ring and finish tightening until the retainer ring is resting against its stops.
  5. Reconnect the fuel lines to the fuel pump.
  6. Reinstall the fuel pump electrical harness connector.
  7. Reinstall the plastic grommet into the floorpan.
  8. Reinstall the rear seat cushion.
  9. Reconnect the negative battery cable.
  10. Start the engine and check for leaks and proper operation.
Rear
Seat cushion

See Figures 5 and 6



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 5: Lift the seat cushion straight up to release the retaining clips from the floor



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 6: Guide the seat belts through the holes in the cushion

  1. Pull upward on the front of the seat cushion to release the two rear seat cushion retaining clips which attach the front of the seat cushion to the floor.
  2. Guide the seat belts and latches through the seat cushion.
  3. Remove the seat cushion.

Now removing the lower intake is quitre abit more involved and I dont recommend this being done at home if you dont have very good mechanical skills
Expert:  Eric replied 3 years ago.
Hi,

If you feel up to the challenge, here are directions for lower intake replacement:

2.5L Engine
Upper Intake Manifold

See Figures 25 and 26



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 25: Upper intake manifold retaining bolt removal sequence-2.5L engine



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 26: Upper intake manifold retaining bolt installation sequence-2.5L engine

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.


CAUTION
Observe all applicable safety precautions when working around fuel. Whenever servicing the fuel system, always work in a well ventilated area. Do not allow fuel spray or vapors to come in contact with a spark or open flame. Keep a dry chemical fire extinguisher near the work area. Always keep fuel in a container specifically designed for fuel storage; also, always properly seal fuel containers to avoid the possibility of fire or explosion.

  1. Relieve the fuel system pressure.
  2. Drain and recycle the engine coolant.
  3. Remove the water pump pulley shield.
  4. Depress the black retainer with a screwdriver on the upper intake manifold and disconnect the main emission vacuum control and the brake booster vacuum connector from the upper intake manifold.
  5. Remove the accelerator cable and speed control actuator from the throttle body.
  6. Remove the accelerator cable bracket from the intake manifold and move aside.
  7. Remove the idle air control valve fresh air supply hose from the fitting on the upper intake manifold.
  8. Disconnect the wiring harnesses from the throttle position sensor, idle air control valve and the EGR vacuum regulator control.
  9. Remove the vacuum supply hose from the upper intake manifold to the PCV valve at the upper intake manifold.
  10. Disconnect the vacuum supply hoses to the EGR vacuum regulator control and the EGR valve.
  11. Loosen and remove the EGR valve to exhaust manifold tube and move aside.
  12. Remove the Intake Manifold Runner Control (IMRC) vacuum solenoid linkage rod by carefully prying with a screwdriver.
  13. Remove the upper intake manifold retaining bolts in the reverse of the installation sequence illustration.

When removing engine components such as manifolds and cylinder heads, always remove the retaining bolts in a reverse order of their tightening sequence to prevent warpage to the component.

  1. Remove the upper intake manifold and gaskets from the engine.

To install:
  1. Install the upper intake manifold using two new gaskets onto the lower intake manifold.
  2. Install the upper manifold retaining bolts and tighten following the proper sequence to 71-106 inch lbs. (8-12 Nm).
  3. Install new bushings for the IMRC linkage rod and install the rod.
  4. Reinstall the EGR valve to exhaust manifold tube and tighten the nut to 26-33 ft. lbs. (35-45 Nm).
  5. Reconnect the vacuum supply hoses to the EGR vacuum regulator control and the EGR valve.
  6. Reconnect the throttle position sensor, idle air control valve and the EGR vacuum regulator control.
  7. Reinstall the idle air control valve fresh air supply hose to the fitting on the upper intake manifold.
  8. Reinstall the accelerator cable bracket to the intake manifold.
  9. Reinstall the speed control actuator and the accelerator cable to the throttle body.
  10. Reinstall the main emission vacuum control connector and the brake booster vacuum connector to the upper intake manifold.
  11. Reinstall the water pump pulley shield.
  12. Reconnect the negative battery cable.
  13. Run the engine and check for leaks.

LOWER Intake Manifold

See Figures 27, 28 and 29



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 27: Lower intake manifold retaining bolt removal sequence-2.5L engine



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 28: Lower intake manifold assembly mounting-2.5L engine



Click image to see an enlarged view

Fig. Fig. 29: Lower intake manifold retaining bolt installation sequence-2.5L engine

  1. Remove the upper intake manifold as outlined in this Section.
  2. Disconnect the fuel injector wiring harness and move aside.
  3. Disconnect the vacuum line to the fuel pressure regulator and the IMRC valve and set aside.
  4. Remove the spring lock coupling retainer clips from the fuel supply and return fittings.
  5. Use spring lock coupling disconnect tools ( 3 / 8 inch and 1 / 2 inch) to disconnect the fuel supply and return hoses from the fuel injection supply manifold.
  6. Remove the eight lower intake manifold to cylinder head retaining bolts in reverse of the tighten sequence illustration.
  7. Remove the lower intake manifold and gaskets from the vehicle.
  8. If the lower intake manifold is to be replaced or machined, remove the fuel injectors and the IMRC vacuum solenoid.

To install:
  1. Install the IMRC vacuum solenoid and fuel injectors onto the lower intake manifold. Use a hand vacuum pump to verify operation of the IMRC vacuum solenoid and plate operation at this time.
  2. Thoroughly clean the gasket sealing areas and place two new intake to cylinder head gaskets into position.
  3. Carefully install the lower intake manifold and install the intake manifold to cylinder head retaining bolts.
  4. Tighten the retaining bolts in sequence to 71-106 inch lbs. (8-12 Nm).
  5. Install the fuel supply and return hoses to the fuel supply manifold and ensure that the spring lock couplings are correctly installed.
  6. Install the retaining clips onto the spring lock couplings.
  7. Reconnect the vacuum line to the fuel pressure regulator and the IMRC vacuum solenoid.
  8. Temporarily connect the negative battery cable.
  9. Reconnect the fuel pressure gauge to the fuel pressure relief valve located on the fuel injection supply manifold.
  10. Cycle the ignition key several times to the RUN position to pressurize the fuel system.
  11. Watch the fuel pressure gauge for signs of leakage. If the gauge holds pressure, remove the gauge and continue with the installation of the upper intake manifold. If the pressure gauge loses pressure, remove the fuel injection supply manifold and replace the leaking O-ring(s) before continuing.
  12. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  13. Reposition and install the fuel injector wiring harness.
  14. Install the upper intake manifold as outlined in this Section.
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

The dealership said that there would be added cost to the repair, due to them having to lower the gas tank.

 

But it seems everything is done without having to do this. What exactly are they talking about in this case?

 

And it seems that you are just giving me instructions on how to replace the fuel pump. What about replacing the fuel sending assembly or are they the same thing. And also in addition, how dangerous is this work. Not too bad I am hoping.

Expert:  Eric replied 3 years ago.
Hi,

Honestly not sure why they are quoting for lowering the tank as it is accessible from the rear seat area.

The fuel pump and fuel sending assembly are one in the same thing.

It isnt dangerous as long as you disconnect the battery to prevent any possible sparking from the connector, and as long as you dont light a cigarette while doing the work.
Expert:  Eric replied 3 years ago.
Hi,

Honestly not sure why they are quoting for lowering the tank as it is accessible from the rear seat area, unless they just think you wont know better

The fuel pump and fuel sending assembly are one in the same thing.

It isnt dangerous as long as you disconnect the battery to prevent any possible sparking from the connector, and as long as you dont light a cigarette while doing the work.
Eric, Automotive Repair Shop Manager
Category: Ford
Satisfied Customers: 24044
Experience: Automotive Repair Shop Manager, Technician
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