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Virtual Wrench (L J)
Virtual Wrench (L J), Ford Mechanic
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Experience:  35 years Master Mechanic
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1995 Ford Escort: it just dies..starts right..runs fine..stall

Customer Question

1995 Ford Escort- Engine idles fine, getting fuel, and after about one minute it just dies, but immediatley starts right up and runs fine down the road and anywhere. But at idle, like at a light, within a minute or so will just stall.
Submitted: 7 years ago.
Category: Ford
Expert:  Virtual Wrench (L J) replied 7 years ago.

The Idle Air Control (IAC) valve is used to control idle speed. The amount of air allowed to bypass the throttle plate is determined by the PCM.

When the engine is cold, air flows through the valve during all modes of engine operation to maintain the factory set idle speed. This will need to be tested before replacement, but it is more than likely the problem.


TESTING


1.8L Engines

See Figure 1

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 1: Typical IAC valve wiring schematic and connector terminal identification-1.8L engines


  1. Turn the ignition key OFF.

  2. Connect jumper wires from the sensor connector to the wiring harness. This permits the engine to operate normally while you check the sensor.

  3. Connect a Digital Volt Ohmmeter (DVOM), set to read resistance, between sensor terminal SIG and the negative battery cable.

  4. The resistance should not be greater than 10,000 ohms.

  5. Connect the DVOM, set to read resistance, between sensor terminal VPWR and the negative battery cable.

  6. The resistance should not be greater than 10,000 ohms.

  7. Turn the ignition key ON.

  8. Connect the DVOM, set to read voltage, between sensor terminal VPWR and the negative battery cable.

  9. The voltage should be more than 1 volt.

  10. Connect the DVOM, set to read voltage, between sensor terminal SIG and the negative battery cable.

  11. The voltage should be more than 1 volt.

  12. If the readings are not within specifications, replace the IAC valve.


1.9L and 2.0L Engines

See Figures 2, 3 and 4

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 2: IAC valve (solenoid) connector terminal locations-1.9L and 2.0L engines


  1. Turn the ignition key OFF.

  2. Unplug the sensor electrical connection.

Due to the diode in the IAC valve, be sure to observe the correct polarity when connecting the DVOM.

  1. Connect a Digital Volt Ohmmeter (DVOM), set to read resistance, between the sensor terminals as follows. Connect the positive lead to the VPWR terminal and the negative lead to the IAC terminal.

  2. The resistance should be between 6 and 13 ohms.

  3. Measure the resistance between either of the valve terminals and the valve body. The resistance should be greater than 10,000 ohms.

  4. If the resistances are not within specification, replace the sensor.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 3: Connect the DVOM positive lead to the VPWR terminal and the negative lead to the IAC terminal. The resistance should be between 6 and 13 ohms


Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 4: Measure resistance between either of the valve terminals and the valve body. The resistance should be greater than 10,000 ohms



REMOVAL & INSTALLATION


1.8L Engines

See Figure 5

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

  2. Remove the throttle body.

  3. Unfasten the IAC valve retaining screws and remove the valve.

  4. Remove and discard the valve gasket.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 5: Unfasten the IAC valve retaining screws and remove the valve-1.8L engines


To install:

  1. Install a new valve gasket.

  2. Install the valve and tighten its retaining screws to 25-36 inch lbs. (3-4 Nm).

  3. Install the throttle body.

  4. Connect the negative battery cable.


1.9L and 2.0L Engines

See Figure 6

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

  2. If necessary on 2.0L engines, remove the air cleaner outlet tube for easier access.

  3. Unplug the IAC valve electrical connection.

  4. Unfasten the valve retainers, then remove the valve and gasket.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 6: Location of the IAC valve retainers-2.0L engines


To install:

  1. Use a scraper to CAREFULLY clean the IAC valve mating surfaces.

  2. Install a new IAC valve gasket and valve.

  3. Install and tighten the valve retainers to 71-97 inch lbs. (8-11 Nm).

  4. Attach the IAC valve electrical connection.

  5. If removed, install the air cleaner outlet tube.

  6. Connect the negative battery cable.

 

If you have further questions on this, please feel free to reply.

Thanks for asking!

V W

 

Customer: replied 7 years ago.
Reply to Virtual Wrench's Post: Did not fix problem, after changing IAC Valve
Expert:  Virtual Wrench (L J) replied 7 years ago.

You most likely have a vacuum leak in the system somewhere. Do a visual inspection of all of the vacuum hoses for any that may have became disconnected or rotted and replace as needed. Also check the egr valve and make sure it is not all carboned up and not fully seating, this will cause a substantial vacuum leak.

If nothing is found, you should have the computer scanned for any diagnostic codes that may have been stored in the systems memory.

A malfunctioning EGR valve can cause one or more of the following:

  • Detonation

  • Rough idle or stalling on deceleration

  • Hesitation or surge

  • Abnormally low power at wide-open throttle

 

COMPONENT TESTING

Before performing any test on the EGR system components, make sure the hoses are not kinked or damaged, any electrical connection are loose, corroded or damaged.

 

Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Valve

See Figure 1

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 1: Some EGR valves may be tested using a vacuum pump by watching for diaphragm movement

 

  1. Start the car and let the engine reach normal operating temperature.

  2. Turn the engine OFF and connect a vacuum tester (pump) to the EGR valve vacuum source port.

  3. Turn the engine ON and idle the engine.

  4. Slowly apply 5-10 in. Hg (16-33 kPa) of vacuum; if the engine idles roughly or stalls, the EGR valve is functioning properly.

  5. If the engine does not idle rough replace the EGR valve.

 

EGR Vacuum Regulator (EVR) Solenoid

See Figure 2

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 2: EVR solenoid wiring schematic

 

  1. Unplug the EVR solenoid electrical connection.

  2. Using a high impedance Digital Volt Ohmmeter (DVOM), probe the terminals of the solenoid.

  3. The resistance should be 20-70 ohms on 1991-96 models, or 26-40 ohms on 1997-99 models.

There are two types of EVR solenoids used. One is a normally open solenoid and the other is a normally closed solenoid. Follow both testing procedures to determine which type of solenoid you are testing.

  1. For a normally open solenoid, test it as follows:

    1. Trace the hose that runs from the solenoid to the EGR valve and unplug the hose from the solenoid.

    2. Using a hand pump, apply 10-15 in. Hg (33-50 kPa) of vacuum to the solenoid. The vacuum should hold.

    3. Apply 12 volts to the solenoid and the vacuum should be released.

  2. For a normally closed solenoid, test it as follows:

    1. Trace the hose that runs from the solenoid to the EGR valve and unplug the hose from the solenoid.

    2. Using a hand pump, apply 10-15 in. Hg (33-50 kPa) of vacuum to the solenoid. The vacuum should not hold.

    3. Apply 12 volts to the solenoid, then re-apply 10-15 in. Hg (33-50 kPa) of vacuum and it should hold.

  3. If the solenoid does not meet the specifications outlined in the tests, it may be defective and must be replaced.

Pressure Feedback Electronic (PFE)/Differential Pressure Feedback Electronic (DPFE) EGR System

See Figure 3

The PFE type system is a subsonic, closed loop EGR system that controls EGR flow rate by monitoring the pressure drop across a remotely located sharp-edge orifice. With a PFE system, the EGR valve only serves as a pressure regulator, rather than as a flow metering device. The Differential Pressure Feedback EGR (DPFE) system operates in the same manner, except that it also monitors the pressure drop across the metering orifice. This allows for a more accurate assessment of EGR flow requirements.

Click image to see an enlarged view
Fig. 3: PFE/DPFE sensor wiring schematic

 

  1. Unplug the PFE/DPFE sensor electrical connection.

  2. Turn the ignition key to the ON position, but do not start the engine.

  3. Using a high impedance Digital Volt Ohmmeter (DVOM) set to read voltage, probe the DPFE/PFE terminal of the sensor. The voltage should be approximately 0.45 volts.

  4. Using a hand held vacuum pump, apply 8-9 in. Hg (27-30 kPa).

  5. The voltage should be above 4 volts.

  6. Quickly release the vacuum from the sensor and the voltage should drop to less than one volt in three seconds.

  7. If the readings are not as specified, the sensor may be defective and should be replaced.

 

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION

 

EGR Valve

  1. Loosen the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve-to-exhaust manifold tube nut at the valve.

  2. Unplug the EGR valve hose.

  3. Unfasten the EGR valve bolts.

  4. Remove the EGR valve and gasket.

  5. Clean the old gasket material from the EGR valve mounting surface.

To install:

  1. Install a new gasket and the EGR valve.

  2. Tighten the valve retaining bolts and connect the hose.

  3. Tighten the EGR valve-to-exhaust manifold tube nut at the valve.

 

EGR Vacuum Regulator (EVR) Solenoid

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

  2. Unplug the EVR solenoid's electrical connection.

  3. Tag and disconnect the hose(s) from the EVR solenoid.

  4. If equipped, loosen the retainers and remove the EVR solenoid.

  5. Installation is the reverse of removal.

Pressure Feedback Electronic (PFE)/Differential Pressure Feedback Electronic (DPFE) Sensor

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

  2. Unplug the PFE/DPFE sensor electrical connection.

  3. Tag and disengage the hose(s) from the sensor.

  4. Unfasten the retainers and remove the sensor.

  5. Installation is the reverse of removal.

Expert:  Virtual Wrench (L J) replied 7 years ago.

If you have further questions on this, please feel free to reply.

Thanks for asking!

V W

 

Customer: replied 7 years ago.
Reply to Virtual Wrench's Post: Your suggestions did not fix the problem- egr is fine. still stall after replace IAC valve and vacuum testing egr...
Customer: replied 7 years ago.
the vacuum system checks out...
Expert:  Virtual Wrench (L J) replied 7 years ago.

Did you do the testing before replacing the IAC?

Did you remove the egr valve and look inside for carbon deposits?

Customer: replied 7 years ago.
yes, it was between 6-13 ohms but I replaced anyway as it has 101,000. Also replaced EGR valve. It seem that there were carbon deposits on the EGR
Expert:  Virtual Wrench (L J) replied 7 years ago.
I really think this is vacuum related, i will get you the vacuum diagram for the engine, but i need to know if it is the 1.8L or 1.9L engine please.
Customer: replied 7 years ago.
1.9
Expert:  Virtual Wrench (L J) replied 7 years ago.

Thanks,

Here is the vacuum routing for the engine, pay particular attention to the hoses and components in the lower portion of the diagram. It is common to have a leak in or around the carbon canister. You might try disconnecting the vacuum source at the throttle body and plug the port on the throttle body and test to see if it helps, that will tell you if you have a leak in those components. Let me know if you find anything.

 

graphic

 

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