How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask RayAnswers Your Own Question
RayAnswers
RayAnswers, Lawyer
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 36962
Experience:  30 years as a family law lawyer .
8534270
Type Your Family Law Question Here...
RayAnswers is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

How far back can you file for child support in Kansas. My ex

Customer Question

how far back can you file for child support in Kansas. My ex never paid any child support when I has full custody of my son. He is now 23 but she should have paid from the time he was 16 to when he turned 18 or finished high school
Submitted: 6 days ago.
Category: Family Law
Expert:  RayAnswers replied 6 days ago.

Hi and welcome to JA. Ray here to help you today.Please bear with me a few moments while I review your question and respond.

Expert:  RayAnswers replied 6 days ago.

You can file for arrears to age 20 for the child here.Age 18 plus two years.Generally, installments due after 7/1/81 are enforceable until 2 years after child is emancipated. With appropriate actions, enforcement may be extended indefinitely. Installments due before 7/1/81 may be enforceable, but require case by case determination. In a proceeding for arrearages, the statute of limitation under the laws of Kansas or of the state issuing the order, whichever is longer, applies.

If the child is under age 20 you can still seek child support here.

I appreciate the chance to help you tonight.Thanks again.

If you can positive rate it is always much appreciated.

Customer: replied 6 days ago.
now that he is 23 I can not go back and request the support that should have been paid
Expert:  RayAnswers replied 6 days ago.

No sorry under Kansas law you can file for child support until age 20 here.Please don't shoot the messenger.This is the statute of limitations.

Expert:  RayAnswers replied 6 days ago.

Statute of Limitations on Child Support for Kansas

Kansas child support statute of limitations including the civil code, what age paternity must be established and emancipate rules.

Kansas Age of Majority: when child support payments can be stopped.

18 years of age.

Statutory cite or civil code reference for the age of majority?

K.S.A. 60-1610(a)

If not addressed in the order, at what age is child support automatically terminated as a matter of State law?

Support automatically extended through June 30 of the school year (July 1 - June 30) during which child turns 18, unless court specifically orders otherwise; on motion, court has discretion to extend through the school year in which the child turns 19, but only if both parents participate or acquiesce in the decision that delayed completion of high school.

Does the date of the order impact what law is applied?

No

Does child support end if the child leaves the household but does not emancipate?

No

Is support ever paid beyond the age of majority?

Yes

Statute of Limitations to enforce a child support order.

Generally, installments due after 7/1/81 are enforceable until 2 years after child is emancipated. With appropriate actions, enforcement may be extended indefinitely. Installments due before 7/1/81 may be enforceable, but require case by case determination. In a proceeding for arrearages, the statute of limitation under the laws of Kansas or of the state issuing the order, whichever is longer, applies.

Statute of Limitations to establish paternity:

18 years of age.

Is dormancy revival/renewal possible?

Yes, generally dormant judgements may be revived anytime before 2 years following the emancipation of the child.

Expert:  RayAnswers replied 6 days ago.

Again I am trying to give you good reference to the law.I wish I could give you better news. Please don't shoot hte messenger.

Related Family Law Questions