How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask RobertJDFL Your Own Question
RobertJDFL
RobertJDFL, Lawyer
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 12132
Experience:  Experienced in multiple areas of the law.
18284290
Type Your Family Law Question Here...
RobertJDFL is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

What do I need to win custody over of my child in Maryland?

Customer Question

What do I need to win custody over of my child in Maryland?
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Family Law
Expert:  RobertJDFL replied 5 months ago.

Thank you for using Just Answer. I look forward to assisting you this evening.

Under Maryland law, both natural parents are the presumed natural custodians of their children. The law does not favor either the mother or father. The law looks at the "best interest" of the child standard when deciding on child custody and visitation. The "best interest" of the child standard looks at certain factors to determine what is best for the child (or children).

Regardless of any agreement you may have reached, the courts will look at custody to determine the "best interests" of the child. They look at several factors. No single factor is most important. This is a list of some, but not all, of the factors, that courts will consider.

Primary Care Giver - Who is the person who takes care of the child? Who feeds the child, shops for their clothes, gets them up for school, bathes them, and arranges day care? Who does the child turn to when they get hurt?

Fitness - What are the psychological and physical capacities of the parties seeking custody? The court may also consider evidence of abuse by a party against the other parent, the party's spouse, or any child residing within the party's household (including another child).

Character and Reputation

Agreements - Is there a custody agreement already in place?

Ability to Maintain Family Relationships - Who will be best able to help the child keep family relationships? Who is going to let the child speak with their ex-mother-in-law, for example? Who will not penalize the child for any bad action on the part of the other parent?

Child Preference - The decision of the court may be reversed on appeal if the judge will not hear the child's preference. However, the judge may choose to interview the child outside the presence of the parents. A child as young as 5 or 6 years of age may be heard. Though it is rare, the court will hear from a child under 7 years. The child's maturity, and whether the child can tell the truth from fiction will guide the decision whether a child may be heard. A child of at least 10 or 12 years of age is certainly entitled to have their opinions heard and given weight in legal proceedings about custody. Additionally, the court has the power to appoint an attorney for the child in contested cases.

Material Opportunity - Which parent has the financial resources to give the child more things?

Age, Health and Gender of Child

Residences of Parents and Opportunity for Visitation - How close do the parents live to each other? How close do they live to members of the child's extended family? Which parent lives closest to the child's school and social circle?

Length of Separation- how long has the parent been separated from the child?

Any Prior Abandonment or Surrender of Custody - Is there a history of one parent walking out and leaving the other parent to cope with the child and the home? Which parent left when you last broke up?

Religious Views - These will be important in the court's decision only if you can show that religious views affect the physical or emotional well-being of the child.

Disability - A party's disability is only relevant to a custody decision if the disability affects the best interest of the child.

Did you need clarification or additional information about my answer? If so, please reply, I'm happy to assist further. Otherwise, please remember to leave a positive rating for me by clicking on the stars,as experts are not employees of this site and we are only paid if you leave a positive rating. Thank you!

Customer: replied 5 months ago.
Can previous altercations such as former husband beat my now significant other. Could that be held against in terms of my child's well being?
Expert:  RobertJDFL replied 5 months ago.

Most likely not, unless there is evidence that the former husband was abusive to the child.

Expert:  RobertJDFL replied 5 months ago.

Just following up to see if I can be of any further assistance?

If so, please reply, I'm happy to assist further. Otherwise, please remember to leave a positive rating for me by clicking on the stars,as experts are not employees of this site and we are only paid if you leave a positive rating. Thank you!