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Law Educator, Esq.
Law Educator, Esq., Lawyer
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 115451
Experience:  Experienced attorney: Family law, Estate Law, SS Law etc.
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Good morning. I am in South Carolina. My husband & I have

Customer Question

Good morning. I am in South Carolina. My husband & I have separated & our 15 year old daughter is with me. He recently made a comment about slitting his wrists & that deeply concerns me. He claims that no harm would ever come to our daughter by him. But by law, do I have to let him see her?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Family Law
Expert:  Law Educator, Esq. replied 1 year ago.
Thank you for your question. I look forward to working with you to provide you the information you are seeking for educational purposes only.
Absent any written court order, you do not have to allow him to see the child. If you believe he will be a danger to himself or others, you can also go to court to seek an involuntary commitment order to have him brought to the hospital for a 72 hour observation and examination. Until he goes to court to file a motion/petition for custody, you do not have to allow her to see the father if you believe him to be such a danger.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thank you. With my daughter being 15 years old...if we were to go before a judge, is it ultimately up to her & if she wants to see him or not?
Expert:  Law Educator, Esq. replied 1 year ago.
Thank you for your reply.
If you go before a judge, at*****may consider the wishes of the child and usually does as long as the wishes are reasonable and based on facts. So yes, if the child has good cause for not wanting to visit with him the court would honor those wishes in most all cases.

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