How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask FamilyAnswer Your Own Question
FamilyAnswer
FamilyAnswer, Lawyer
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 24937
Experience:  10 + years of handling Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody and Child Support cases
9540344
Type Your Family Law Question Here...
FamilyAnswer is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

How can I make my daughter-in-law who hates my son since they

Customer Question

how can I make my daughter-in-law who hates my son since they are getting a divorce let me have rights to see my grandson.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Family Law
Expert:  FamilyAnswer replied 1 year ago.
Hi! I will be the professional that will be helping you today. I look forward to providing you with information to help solve your problem.
Good morning. I certainly understand the situation and your concern. In order to force/make her allow this, you would need to proceed through the court and have it court ordered. Ideally, if they are getting a divorce and separated at that time, when you son has your grandson, he would make sure you are present and involved. However, if the mother has the child, it is at her discretion right now, to allow for him to come see you. Since she refuses, you need to retain counsel and have it court ordered. The family court may order visitation for the grandparents of a minor child where either or both of the child’s parents are deceased, divorced, or separated and if:
(1) the child’s parents or guardians are unreasonably depriving the grandparent of the opportunity to visit with the child, including denying visitation of the minor child to the grandparent for a period exceeding ninety days; and
(2) awarding grandparent visitation would not interfere with the parent-child relationship; and:
(a) the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the child’s parents or guardians are unfit; or
(b) the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that there are compelling circumstances to overcome the presumption that the parental decision is in the child’s best interest.
If you can show this, then the Judge has the discretion to grant it.
Please let me know if you have any follow up questions or need any clarification on something which I stated above. Also, remember to rate my service before exiting the site, so I can receive credit for my help. I hope you found it to be Excellent! Only rate my answer when you are 100% satisfied. If you feel the need to click either of the two lower ratings to the left, please stop and reply to me. I want to make sure your experience with the site was as pleasurable as possible and that you are satisfied with the help I provided.
Expert:  FamilyAnswer replied 1 year ago.
I just wanted to follow up and see if you had any other questions or needed me to clarify something. I am here to help, so please let me know. Thanks!

Related Family Law Questions