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Roger
Roger, Attorney
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 31016
Experience:  BV Rated by Martindale-Hubbell; SuperLawyer rating by Thompson-Reuters
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What's the best route to take in regards ***** ***** and keeping

Customer Question

What's the best route to take in regards ***** ***** and keeping boundaries if your spouse asks for an "in house" 6 month trial separation. One child lives in the house as well.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Family Law
Expert:  Roger replied 1 year ago.
Hi - my name is ***** ***** I'm a Family Law litigation attorney. Thanks for your question. I'll be glad to assist.
A trial separation has no legal affect as it is not considered a legal separation. Instead, it is simply an agreement between the spouses to live in separate places (but usually in the same house) to see if the marriage can be saved or to see whether they should move on to legal separation or divorce.
So, there is really not much of a protocol on what to and not to do.......but the main changes are living apart in separate bedrooms and limit contact and communication to how things would be if you were to permanently separate or divorce. So, what you're doing with the contact during meal time and bed time with the child is a good thing......and trying to operate under the same roof as if you are divorced/separated is the best way to make the trial period work.
Also, I always recommend that my clients try to get counseling (from a pastor or a psychologist, etc.). That's good to really help each of you pinpoint the problems and whether you can resolve them and move on or whether the issues can't be overcome.
Other than that, there's really no specific protocol.......you just have to treat the situation as if you are separated or divorced to determine if that's what you want.

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