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Barrister
Barrister, Lawyer
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 33708
Experience:  Attorney with 15 years experience
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I am a 59 year old male living in New Mexico. Yesterday

Customer Question

I am a 59 year old male living in New Mexico.
Yesterday I received an email from a 33 year old woman living in California, stating that when she was 14, while her mother was dying, mom told her that the fathers name on her birth certificate was not her genetic father. That her genetic father was a man named Marc Mintz.
she named her mother (indeed I did have a one night stand with her approximately 33 years ago), and asked if I was this "Marc Mintz". She claimed she was inquiring so that she could know any medical or genetic family background that could be of value to both her and her daughter.
Given that the mother died 19 years ago, the daughter is 33, are there any possible legal ramifications I could be looking at?
Marc Mintz
***@******.*** (###) ###-####
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Family Law
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.
Hello and welcome! My name is ***** ***** I will try my level best to help with your situation or get you to someone who can.
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""Given that the mother died 19 years ago, the daughter is 33, are there any possible legal ramifications I could be looking at?""
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I don't see any potential issues with any type of child support allegations because presumably the presumptive father on the birth certificate supported the child until she turned 18.
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Since the child is now an adult, you have no legal duty to agree to any type of paternity test that would confirm or deny paternity.
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So legally, you can simply ignore this person if you choose to do so as you have no financial obligations to them.
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If you did agree to a paternity test and it was positive, then if you were to pass without a will in place, that person would be able to claim a portion of your estate due to being a proven biological child.
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But other than that, there aren't any other legal ramifications, and then only if you voluntarily agree to a paternity test.
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thanks
Barrister

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