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socrateaser
socrateaser, Lawyer
Category: Family Law
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Experience:  Retired (mostly)
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Socrateaser: Is there any kind of a statute in Family Law that

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Socrateaser: Is there any kind of a statute in Family Law that prevents a parent from:
1. Making Racist comments about the other parent
2. Stop one parent from making Demeaning comments about the other parent.
3. Stop using the kids as intermediaries about money and paying for activities, e
4. Stop the other parent from calling me a "Jew" which is a term the children are using now towards me when I don't have money to pay something. BTW: I have involved Judaism in my life so I find it offensive coming from my own children.
5. Keep the second language (tagalog) "In Effect" and in use at the other home so Mom who also speaks fluent tagalog does not destroy the investment I've made in teaching my children a second language.
6. Keep the investment I've made in teaching God to the children at the other home. She is dissmissing God to the point that the children are indifferent and at times almost becoming atheists.

I realize that some of these items are "touchy" and there might not be any Laws in place but would love to at least tackle what I can. Thanks!
1. Making Racist comments about the other parent

A: No direct statute, but FC 271 provides authority for sanctions against a party who frustrates the settlement of a case. Unfortunately, the sanctions generally mean an order of attorney's fees and costs in favor of the vindicated parent. But, since you're not represented by counsel, your cost recovery would be minimal.

If the orders specifically prohibit the parent from disparaging you, then your recourse would be an action for contempt. But, you have to get the order first, and then prove that the disparagement occurred.

2. Stop one parent from making Demeaning comments about the other parent.

A: Most custody orders require that parents not disparage each other. Once the order is made, violation is punishable by contempt. The trick, however, usually is proof, because parents rarely disparage in writing.

3. Stop using the kids as intermediaries about money and paying for activities, e

A: Provisions can be placed into the general custody orders, to maintain that communications re financial issues must not be communicated to the children. Same difficulties re proof usually arise -- so, in practice in can be very difficult to successfully prosecute a contempt.

4. Stop the other parent from calling me a "Jew" which is a term the children are using now towards me when I don't have money to pay something. BTW: I have involved Judaism in my life so I find it offensive coming from my own children.

A: I've encountered this more than once. If you can prove it happens, then that would be strong evidence for reversing custody. But, it's all about proof.

5. Keep the second language (tagalog) "In Effect" and in use at the other home so Mom who also speaks fluent tagalog does not destroy the investment I've made in teaching my children a second language.

A: This is not likely to be ordered by the court. Not that knowledge of other languages is bad, but the court is not in the business of enforcing affirmative parenting obligations, because it requires too much direct supervision, and the court can't do it.

6. Keep the investment I've made in teaching God to the children at the other home. She is dismissing God to the point that the children are indifferent and at times almost becoming atheists.

A: This goes back to the disparagement issue. But, affirmatively requiring children to practice a particular theology is actually unconstitutional. The court cannot make orders concerning the "establishment of religion" or "free exercise" thereof -- because to do so violates the 1st Amendment.

Hope this helps.
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