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Jack R.
Jack R., Family Law Attorney
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 6147
Experience:  OH/TX Mediator and Attorney dealing with Family, Child, and Divorce Law
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I would like to break even at the end of the year, because

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I would like to break even at the end of the year, because I don't want to owe the IRS. Would it be best to claim myself, my son on my taxes or just myself. In addition I have other funds and retire from public schools

-Could you explain your situation a little more?

 

Are you married

How old is you son

How many month's out of the year your son live live with you

Did you provide for more than half of his expenses ?

IS your son disabled ?

Is anyone else eligible to claim him as a deduction ?

Is your son working ?


I need this information to better assess your situation. Thank you.

Jack R. and 2 other Family Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

Yes I am married but living apart, I provide for myself and my health 12 years old son and he stays with me 98% of the time. Husband contribute $500.00 a month

If you cannot file jointly it would be best to claim yourself, and your child. Your best filing status is probably unmarried head of household. I know you said you were married however, the IRS allows a taxpayer to be considered as if he or she is unmarried for the purpose of qualifying for head of household status. if

1) You are legally married and have lived in a separate residence from your spouse for at least the last six months.

2) you and your spouse will separate tax returns

3) You provide for more than half the cost of maintaining a home for yourself,

4) You have a child, stepchild or foster-child residing at your home for more than half the year.

 

This would put you in the best situation. Taxpayers who qualify for the Head of Household filing status benefit from a higher standard deduction and lower tax rates compared to single filing status.

 

Your other choice is Married filing separately which does not provide as many tax breaks and generally regarded as the most costly method of filing.

 

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This communication does not establish an attorney-client relationship.Information provided here is not legal advice. Rather it is simply general information.

 

 

 

Jack R. and 2 other Family Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

we live apart but file jointly in addition, he has real estate property which is file a lone with our family taxes. Should I file separately or jointly. Which is best for me!

Usually filing jointly provides the best solution. The best approach is just to calculate the tax based on the filing options.

 

If you found this answer useful please press the appropriate quality of service button of 3 or greater. This is needed so I can get credit for my answer. If you have follow up questions please ask.

 

This communication does not establish an attorney-client relationship.Information provided here is not legal advice. Rather it is simply general information.