How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Michael J, Esq. Your Own Question
Michael J, Esq.
Michael J, Esq., Lawyer
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 3426
Experience:  Licensed Attorney - represented hundreds of clients in criminal cases, family law disputes, traffic issues, and general legal issues. Youth Court Prosecutor.
18210975
Type Your Family Law Question Here...
Michael J, Esq. is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

My x husband, a Union Powerlineman whose child support is garnished

This answer was rated:

My x husband, a Union Powerlineman whose child support is garnished failed a drug test (THC). He quit his job before he could get fired to avoid losing his commercial drivers license (CDL). He now wants a deduction in child support because he is not working. What legal rights doI have?

SoloLawyer :

Hello - Thank you for contacting JustAnswer. My name is Michael; I look forward to helping you with your family law problem today.


 

SoloLawyer :

I'm sorry to hear about your situation. If he is trying to find another job, the court will most likely grand his deduction. In this instance, the Court will look to see whether he is intentionally underemploying himself. This means taking a part time job that makes less money, or not taking a job at all, specifically so he doesn't have to pay you. If the court finds this to be true, they can order him to pay child support based on what he should be making. If the Court finds he is actively looking for proper employment, they will most likely grant the deduction until he can be gainfully employed.


 

Customer:

Michael, his garnished child support has been in place for 14 years. At least 11 of those years has been with FPL Florida Power and Light. What other questions have you. Beverly

SoloLawyer :

Did you see my answer?


 

SoloLawyer :

I'll re-post it again: I'm sorry to hear about your situation. If he is trying to find another job, the court will most likely grand his deduction. In this instance, the Court will look to see whether he is intentionally underemploying himself. This means taking a part time job that makes less money, or not taking a job at all, specifically so he doesn't have to pay you. If the court finds this to be true, they can order him to pay child support based on what he should be making. If the Court finds he is actively looking for proper employment, they will most likely grant the deduction until he can be gainfully employed.


 

SoloLawyer :

I have to run from the office for lunch. If I can answer anything further, let me know and I will answer when I return to the office. Remember, I'm here to help and your satisfaction is guaranteed. If you don't have any questions and you valued my time, I'd ask you to consider rating me positively.

Take care,

Michael

Customer:

I have recieved no answer!

SoloLawyer :

Beverly - I have posted the answer twice. Are you having technical problems? I'll post it again.


 

SoloLawyer :

I'm sorry to hear about your situation. If he is trying to find another job, the court will most likely grand his deduction. In this instance, the Court will look to see whether he is intentionally underemploying himself. This means taking a part time job that makes less money, or not taking a job at all, specifically so he doesn't have to pay you. If the court finds this to be true, they can order him to pay child support based on what he should be making. If the Court finds he is actively looking for proper employment, they will most likely grant the deduction until he can be gainfully employed.


 

Michael J, Esq. and 3 other Family Law Specialists are ready to help you

Related Family Law Questions