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I live in Cook County in the state of Illinois. I have a child

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I live in Cook County in the state of Illinois. I have a child that has just turned 18 that I have been paying support for several years. I was never married to the mother. Can I be forced or held liable to pay college tuition or related expenses? The mother is saying I'm required to pay 1/3, I thought that was the case only if we had been married.
Good morning!

Unfortunately, in Illinois, a court can order a parent to provide for an adult child's college expenses.
This is true even when the parents were never married.
A never-married parent's obligations to support a child are no lesser and no greater than that of a parent who was previously married.
I know that this probably isn't what you wanted to hear. However, it's the honest truth and I know you want an accurate answer.
Customer: replied 5 years ago.
Thank you very much for the info. One more thing, do you know what that amount is? They took 20% up until 18. Is it 1/3 of the tuition or another amount? What if 1/3 is more than the 20% I was paying?
The statute does not specify a percentage. However, it does outline some considerations. for the court.
ftp://12.43.67.2/ILCS/Ch%200750/Act%200005/075000050K513.html
(750 ILCS 5/513) (from Ch. 40, par. 513)
Sec. 513. Support for Non‑minor Children and Educational Expenses.
(a) The court may award sums of money out of the property and income of either or both parties or the estate of a deceased parent, as equity may require, for the support of the child or children of the parties who have attained majority in the following instances:
(1) When the child is mentally or physically
disabled and not otherwise emancipated, an application for support may be made before or after the child has attained majority.
(2) The court may also make provision for the
educational expenses of the child or children of the parties, whether of minor or majority age, and an application for educational expenses may be made before or after the child has attained majority, or after the death of either parent. The authority under this Section to make provision for educational expenses extends not only to periods of college education or professional or other training after graduation from high school, but also to any period during which the child of the parties is still attending high school, even though he or she attained the age of 19. The educational expenses may include, but shall not be limited to, room, board, dues, tuition, transportation, books, fees, registration and application costs, medical expenses including medical insurance, dental expenses, and living expenses during the school year and periods of recess, which sums may be ordered payable to the child, to either parent, or to the educational institution, directly or through a special account or trust created for that purpose, as the court sees fit.
If educational expenses are ordered payable, each
parent and the child shall sign any consents necessary for the educational institution to provide the supporting parent with access to the child's academic transcripts, records, and grade reports. The consents shall not apply to any non‑academic records. Failure to execute the required consent may be a basis for a modification or termination of any order entered under this Section. Unless the court specifically finds that the child's safety would be jeopardized, each parent is entitled to know the name of the educational institution the child attends. This amendatory Act of the 95th General Assembly applies to all orders entered under this paragraph (2) on or after the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 95th General Assembly.
The authority under this Section to make provision
for educational expenses, except where the child is mentally or physically disabled and not otherwise emancipated, terminates when the child receives a baccalaureate degree.
(b) In making awards under paragraph (1) or (2) of subsection (a), or pursuant to a petition or motion to decrease, modify, or terminate any such award, the court shall consider all relevant factors that appear reasonable and necessary, including:
(1) The financial resources of both parents.
(2) The standard of living the child would have
enjoyed had the marriage not been dissolved.
(3) The financial resources of the child.
(4) The child's academic performance.
(Source: P.A. 95‑954, eff. 8‑29‑08.)
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