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Jane Doe Deer
Jane Doe Deer, Lawyer
Category: Family Law
Satisfied Customers: 3896
Experience:  Attorney since 1986; Plain English explanations of support, visitation, custody, etc.
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My Mom is still alive just turned 94, but no longer recognizes

Customer Question

My Mom is still alive just turned 94, but no longer recognizes us, 4 children. My Dad passed away several years ago. My sister was asked by my Mother to move in to my Mom's home. My sister moved in along with her daughter. My sister has held everything together while working full time. All of the rest of us live no where close to my Mom, so the good the bad and the ugly has been on my sisters shoulders. My Mon made a change to her will to include the fact that when she passes my sister can stay in the house for as long as she wants. That is no longer an issue because we took a reverse mortgage on the house and that money is for my mothers care. Terms of the rev. mortg. is that 1 year from Mom's death we need to pay the value of the house back to the company and the house is ours again.
I am the executor of Mom's will. I have told my sister she can have my 1/4 of the house, my brother said that too. My older sister thinks she's getting the house for herself, she says my Dad told her that. Yeah right. The will says we each get it equally.
Anyway, my brother wants to see the revised and original wills because he doesn't believe my mother would say my sister her caregiver could stay in the house.
Does he has a right and can he make my sister tell her son to move out?
Submitted: 6 years ago.
Category: Family Law
Expert:  Jane Doe Deer replied 6 years ago.

Thank you for contacting Just Answer.

 

 

Answer: There's no "right" to see anothe person's will. Was that all you wanted to know?

 

I'm happy to answer follow-up questions. If you have none, please

"ACCEPT" my answer.

 

There can sometimes be a delay of an hour or more in between my followup answers because I may be helping other customers, conducting legal research, or taking a break. If we're writing late in the evening, I may need to get some sleep and resume helping you the following morning.

 

Bonuses of even a dollar are much appreciated and help support this site.

 

 

I REALLY appreciate FEEDBACK so that I can continuously improve!

 

All my best,

 

Jane Doe Deer

 

Jane Doe Deer and 11 other Family Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
If and when I decide to speak to him I can tell him he can wait until my Mom passes to find out what the will says?
He can't tell my sister to tell her son to leave because he doesn't want him there?
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
If and when I decide to speak to him I can tell him he can wait until my Mom passes to find out what the will says?
He can't tell my sister to tell her son to leave because he doesn't want him there? Can he?
Expert:  Jane Doe Deer replied 6 years ago.

You can tell him he'll have to wait until your mom passes.

 

Meanwhile, does anyone have Power of Attorney? Who?

 

Sorry about the delay in getting back to you - I rec'd a phone call.

 

My best,

 

Jane

Customer: replied 6 years ago.
I'm the one with power of attorney also.
Expert:  Jane Doe Deer replied 6 years ago.

Legally, you are the only family member with the right to a copy of your mother's will.

 

However, the more diplomatic you are now, the less of a family feud after your mother passes.

 

It sounds to me as though you have a wolf at the door. You do not have to let him in.

 

My best - you're dealing with an uncomfortable situation.

 

Jane Doe Deer

Customer: replied 6 years ago.
Thank you. You are right.
Expert:  Jane Doe Deer replied 6 years ago.

Thanks!

 

Take care!

 

Jane Doe Deer

 

(Feel free to ask for me by name next time you're here. )

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