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Dr. Rick
Dr. Rick, Board Certified MD
Category: Eye
Satisfied Customers: 10784
Experience:  Ophthalmology since 1994 with Retina sub-specialty interest
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I have UGH syndrome - just diagnosed - where my 18-year-old

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I have UGH syndrome - just diagnosed - where my 18-year-old lens implant rubs against a blood vessel causing bleeding and obscuring the vision in that eye, occasionally to the point where I just see blurred images. My eye doctor had me see a couple of specialists to be sure of the diagnosis, and I'm going to see another who treats the syndrome. The treatments don't sound too bad, but in that eye, I've had a number of operations, including a scleral buckle, related to a severely detached retina, also 18 years ago. So, I'd like to avoid surgery there if possible.

So the questions is this. Are there any non-surgical or minimally invasive solutions to UGH?

Dr. Rick :

Hi. I'm Dr. Rick and I have two decades of ophthalmology experience. I'm online and happy to answer your question today.

Dr. Rick :

Is your intraocular lens in the anterior chamber, the bag, the ciliary sulcus or sewn in place?

Dr. Rick :

How long has the bleeding been going on?

Dr. Rick :

What medication problems do you have and what medications are you taking?

Dr. Rick :

What drops, etc are you using for your eye pressure? What is your pressure on your current therapy when you are at your worst (active bleeding, ghost cells etc)?

Dr. Rick :

I see that you are offline. I will switch to Q&A format. This format works a lot like 'text messaging' but an email is sent to each of us anytime something is posted to this thread. We can continue to work on your question there..... :)


John,


Dr. Rick : Hi. I'm Dr. Rick and I have two decades of ophthalmology experience. I'm online and happy to answer your question today.
Dr. Rick : Is your intraocular lens in the anterior chamber, the bag, the ciliary sulcus or sewn in place?
Dr. Rick : How long has the bleeding been going on?
Dr. Rick : What medication problems do you have and what medications are you taking?
Dr. Rick : What drops, etc are you using for your eye pressure? What is your pressure on your current therapy when you are at your worst (active bleeding, ghost cells etc)?
Dr. Rick :

This is not an answer, but an Information Request. I need this information to answer your question. Please reply, so I can answer your question. I look forward to helping you.
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

The lens is anterior (front?). I can't really be sure how long because I think the blood cells have been there a while, but the first episode of blocked vision was in November 2012 and I saw a doc in the practice right away and it cleared up after about 3 hours. I take 81mg asprin daily and the PCP wants me to stay on because I'm a controlled diabetic. My pressure is 15-21 but one day when I went in right after a blood release is went to 30. I take Lotemax 4/day for inflammation and something with a dark blue cap 2/day for pressure.

John,

I'm sorry to say this but, from what you have posted I feel that your best option is to have the offending lens explanted and, depending on the anatomy of your eyeball a posterior chamber lens put in the ciliary sulcus (capsular bag if possible...but that probably is not an option since you have an anterior lens now) or a sewn in lens. Another option, although not as convenient, would be to remain aphakic (no lens in your eye) and wear a special contact lens.

As a retina surgeon I come across this issue fairly frequently and in the majority of cases where an intraocular lens is causing bleeding the end result is that the lens has to come out.

In your case, since you are experiencing secondary glaucoma, this is even more important.

Does this make sense to you?

I hope this information was helpful for you. But I do work for tips so I want to make sure you are happy with me before rating me. If you have another question on this or a related issue feel free to fire away. You may also receive an email survey after our chat, if you don’t feel that I have earned a “10” rating in all areas, please let me know what I can do to meet your expectations.

Thanks in advance,

Dr. Rick MD FACS

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

If you have an anterior lens does that mean, by definition, that no posterior lens is possible?

John,

That is a very good question, and, no. That is not the case.

There are many reasons to put in an anterior lens at the time of cataract surgery so there is no reason to believe that you can not have a posterior lens placed in your eye now.

Does this make sense to you?

It's safe for you to press the positive feedback button now if you so desire. And, never fear, even after you press that button I don't go up in a puff of smoke -- I'll still be right here to continue helping you, but, as I do work for tips, I want to make sure you are happy before rating me.
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