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Dr. Dan B.
Dr. Dan B., Board Certified Ophthalmologist
Category: Eye
Satisfied Customers: 3343
Experience:  Eye surgeon experienced in cataracts, glaucoma, retina & neuro-ophthalmology
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One of my eyes gets red from time to time, but more frequently

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One of my eyes gets red from time to time, but more frequently recently. I usually wear contacts. When my eye gets red, I try allergy drops which work some of the time, but not all the time. If I stop wearing my contacts for a few days, the redness usually goes away. Once I start wearing my contacts again, a few days later the redness comes back. I have switched out my contacts several times thinking maybe I had an infection. So, I have used new contacts with the same symptoms reappearing. It doesn't itch or hurt, but when my eye is red (inflamed) my vision in that eye is blurry even with my contacts or glasses. Any ideas? I just had an eye evaluation a month and half ago and everything was fine. Since then though, this has been happening every week.

Doctor DanB :

Hello and thanks for your question. Are you available to chat?

Customer:

Yes.


 

Doctor DanB :

Are your eyes sensitive to light when they are red?

Customer:

No.

Doctor DanB :

What brand of contacts do you wear?

Customer:

acuvue oasis for astigmatism


 


they are a brand new order also.

Doctor DanB :

I suspect that you have what is called contact-lens induced keratitis. This can happen in contact lens wearers whose corneas become irritated by the bacteria in their tear film and the toxic products these bacteria produce. These bacteria are normally found in everyone's tear film (or layers of tears that coat the eye). However, this isn't a common thing seen in the general population, because many people don't wear contact lenses. The contact lenses tend to be effective trappers, keeping these bacteria and their inflammation-inciting toxins trapped against the cornea, causing the cornea to breakdown and succumb to inflammation and infection.

The very first step in treating this is to refrain from using the contact lenses for at least a week, but sometimes it requires being out of them for even 2-3 weeks. However, in most patients, this isn't enough to make it go away. Most people will then require and antibiotic/steroid combination drop to help encourage the infection and inflammation to go away. To that end, I would recommend visiting your ophthalmologist to get a complete exam and to get the medicine you need for this--unfortunately you can only get this medicine with a prescription from your doctor.

Doctor DanB :

Does that make sense?

Customer:

Yes.


 


Is it possible to only get this condition in one eye because my other eye is never affected this way when I'm wearing contacts.

Doctor DanB :

Absolutely. The eyes are often asymmetrically affected by problems such as this.

Doctor DanB :

Do you have any other concerns or questions about this topic?

Customer:

No, and thank you.

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