How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dr. Rick Your Own Question
Dr. Rick
Dr. Rick, Board Certified MD
Category: Eye
Satisfied Customers: 10783
Experience:  Ophthalmology since 1994 with Retina sub-specialty interest
48069651
Type Your Eye Question Here...
Dr. Rick is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Hello I am a 61 year old female in good health have hypothyroid

This answer was rated:

Hello I am a 61 year old female in good health have hypothyroid and is taking meds. Since Saturday i have been having a twich on my left cheek going to my left eye and am slighlty swollen on that side in the morning. I do wear glasses and 1month ago had my eyes ck.no issues. No dental problems but will sch. an appointment just in case something is going on.
Help what is going on. Thank you

Dr. Rick :

Hi. I'm online and happy to answer your question today.

Dr. Rick :

The most likely cause of your symptoms is called myokymia. Myokymia is an involuntary, local twitching of a few muscle fibers in the body of a muscle. This twitching, if it occurs in a limb, is not strong enough to actually move a joint but can be felt and sometimes seen as an area of quivering.

Myokymia commonly involves the eyelids and muscles around the orbit. It often appears and resolves for no apparent reason and has not been linked to any underlying significant pathology. What causes myokymia? Studies have shown that it is associated with anxiety, stress, lack of good sleep, high caffeine intake and the use of some drugs.

The best way to treat myokymia is to get more sleep, decrease caffeine intake and decrease stress. The good news is that myokymia is not a sign of serious underlying pathology and often resolves on its own.

Dr. Rick :

Here is an excellent article on this topic:


http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1213160-overview

Dr. Rick :

So. As you can see there is nothing to worry about from what you have posted.

Dr. Rick :

Does this make sense to you?

Dr. Rick :

Please remember the top 3 ratings are positives [Excellent service is my goal] and this is how we are compensated. Rate my answer when you are satisfied. If you feel the need to rate low, please stop and reply to me via the REPLY TO EXPERT button with the issue you have. I will be happy to continue further and do everything I can to provide you with the service you seek.


Otherwise, a high positive rating is very much appreciated, bonuses are great, and find me anytime for follow up.


 


Let me know if you have further questions.

Dr. Rick :

Oh. Hi. My screen shows that you have just entered the chat room. Do you have any questions or comments for me?

Dr. Rick :

I guess that you have stepped away from your compueter. I'll switch over to the Q&A system. This system works a lot like 'text messaging' but an email is sent to each of us anytime something is posted to this thread. We can continue to work on your question there..... :)

Dr. Rick and other Eye Specialists are ready to help you

We have been experiencing technical difficulties with the chat system. Please allow me to retype my chat here for your review:

Dr. Rick :

Hi. I'm online and happy to answer your question today.

Dr. Rick :

The most likely cause of your symptoms is called myokymia. Myokymia is an involuntary, local twitching of a few muscle fibers in the body of a muscle. This twitching, if it occurs in a limb, is not strong enough to actually move a joint but can be felt and sometimes seen as an area of quivering.

Myokymia commonly involves the eyelids and muscles around the orbit. It often appears and resolves for no apparent reason and has not been linked to any underlying significant pathology. What causes myokymia? Studies have shown that it is associated with anxiety, stress, lack of good sleep, high caffeine intake and the use of some drugs.

The best way to treat myokymia is to get more sleep, decrease caffeine intake and decrease stress. The good news is that myokymia is not a sign of serious underlying pathology and often resolves on its own.

Dr. Rick :

Here is an excellent article on this topic:


http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1213160-overview

Dr. Rick :

So. As you can see there is nothing to worry about from what you have posted.

Dr. Rick :

Does this make sense to you?

Dr. Rick :

Please remember the top 3 ratings are positives [Excellent service is my goal] and this is how we are compensated. Rate my answer when you are satisfied. If you feel the need to rate low, please stop and reply to me via the REPLY TO EXPERT button with the issue you have. I will be happy to continue further and do everything I can to provide you with the service you seek.


Otherwise, a high positive rating is very much appreciated, bonuses are great, and find me anytime for follow up.


 


Let me know if you have further questions.

Dr. Rick :

Oh. Hi. My screen shows that you have just entered the chat room. Do you have any questions or comments for me?

Customer: replied 4 years ago.
Your answer may be far off. Possible Bell palsy thank you.
Has that area of your face now become weak or paralyzed?