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Dr. James
Dr. James, Board Certified Ophthalmologist
Category: Eye
Satisfied Customers: 2286
Experience:  Eye Physician and Surgeon
20222826
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optometrist..loss of peripheral vision..see an ophthalmologist

This answer was rated:

I met with an optometrist to have my eyeglass prescription checked and one of the things she noted was a loss of peripheral vision on the right side. She indicated "normal" was about 75%, my range was 40%. She suggested I might want to see a primary physician, and a friend suggested I should see an ophthalmologist.

Dr. James :

Hello.

Dr. James :

Have you noticed any problems with your peripheral vision?

Dr. James :

Hello?

Customer:

I wouldn't have identified it as such--but the auto accident (Dec. 2009) really puzzled me--I was at a stop light (New Orleans) and going to make a left turn. Pulled into the median, checked the two oncoming lanes for traffic--saw NOTHING, pulled out and suddenly saw a large truck that seemed to come out of nowhere (and at breakneck speed). I was lucky to get out alive (broken collarbone and head injury from hitting the dash hard three times). When the doctor mentioned the side that I'd lost some of the vision, I suddenly wondered if that might have been how I missed seeing the vehicle...

Dr. James :

I would recommend you see an ophthalmologist first.

Dr. James :

He may want to repeat the visual field test.

Dr. James :

Usually loss of peripheral vision is worrisome for strokes and damage to the brain.

Dr. James :

It doesn't seem that you've had this so jumping to an MRI may be premature.

Customer:

thanks--the optometrist also mentioned a hole in the retina might cause it, but she dilated and didn't see that. My father had MS--and I know the symptoms well--his diagnosis took 10 years. My husband has been a bit concerned about loss of strength and I did wonder about stroke possibility..

Dr. James :

Do you have any pain in your eyes?

Dr. James :

especially when you move your eyes?

Customer:

Haven't noticed pain--just very watery at night, and dry eyes have been problem. Optometrist also asked if I had realized how dry the eyelids, skin was. Only pain has been some horrible migraines (flashing lights, nausea) and on a couple of occasions halo-like glowing area on computer screen that took 10-15 minutes to be able to see clearly again.

Dr. James :

With MS, something called optic neuritis is common.

Dr. James :

This is usually associated with eye pain or a dull ache with eye movements.

Dr. James :

Usually, most people would know if they have had a stroke.

Dr. James :

So, seeing an ophthalmologist to confirm the field defect before pursuing the MRI.

Dr. James :

would be helpful.

Customer:

I would characterize my feeling as more "tired" than pain. I switch back and forth between two monitors at work to work on rather detailed financial spreadsheets--and the eyes have been quite worn out! I will follow up with the ophthalmologist and appreciate your time/input.

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