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Ask Dr. Rick Your Own Question
Dr. Rick
Dr. Rick, Board Certified MD
Category: Eye
Satisfied Customers: 11018
Experience:  Ophthalmology since 1994 with Retina sub-specialty interest
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Can edema of eye not be cured I have edema of the eye after

Customer Question

Can edema of eye not be cured? I have edema of the eye after vitrectomy surgery. Have been taking Ketorolac 0.4% ophth solution for eyes since 2/8/11. Have had 2 appointments since then and my next appointment is early Aug. 2011. At one visit he mentioned might needing steroid but vetoed that on my next visit. Question:what is left to be done if eye drops does not cure the edema? Do I accept to live with it and if so, what happens with my eyesight later?
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Eye
Expert:  Dr. Rick replied 5 years ago.

Dr. Rick :

Hi. I'm online and happy to answer your question today.

Dr. Rick :

It sounds like you have cystoid macular edema that occurred after your cataract surgery.

Dr. Rick :

There are a number of treatments available if the ketorolac and topical steroid drops are not working for you.

Dr. Rick :

Are you available to chat?

Dr. Rick :

Hi. Welcome to chat.

Dr. Rick :

Are you being followed by your surgeon or an optometrist at this point?

Dr. Rick :

Are you there?

Customer:

yes.

Customer:

What are some other treatments?

Dr. Rick :

First, I would suggest an OCT, or since I'm old fashioned and a retina subspecialist, a flourescein angiogram, to evaluate you macula at this point.

Dr. Rick :

Depending what is found, I would consider an intraocular injection of long acting steroid (kenalog), possibly laser treatment, perhaps intraocular injection of an anti-VEGF compound (still not mainstream treatment....) and, if none of this worked, a vitrectomy with or without steroids.

Dr. Rick :

Who is treating you now? An ophthalmologist or an optometrist?

Customer:

I am seeing a specialist dealing with this condition but doesn"t seem to have time to give much information. Also am taking warfarin daily which may have him reconsidering steroid.

Dr. Rick :

I would not let the use of warfarin bother me in treating you. So, you are being treated by a retina specialist? If so, then you are being treated by the person best trained to deal with CME. I'm not so sure why she is being so cautious in your treatment but, of course, I do not have access to your complete clinical picture.

Dr. Rick :

Does this answer your question?

Customer:

Yes.

Dr. Rick :



Good. Glad to be of help.


 

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