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Law Educator, Esq.
Law Educator, Esq., Attorney
Category: Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 111489
Experience:  Experienced in Trust and Succession Law, including Louisiana Laws
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My mother is elderly and I may need to move in with her to

Customer Question

My mother is elderly and I may need to move in with her to care for her part time. If I do that I would need to rent out my condo or sell it. If I rent it then I will lose tax benefits of primary residence. If I live with my mother and care for her part time would that qualify her a as a dependent?
Submitted: 4 months ago.
Category: Estate Law
Expert:  Law Educator, Esq. replied 4 months ago.
Thank you for your question. I look forward to working with you to provide you the information you are seeking for educational purposes only.
If you provide more than 50% of her monetary support then she would qualify as your dependent. Just because you are moving in with her to care for her does not mean she is a dependent, you have to actually provide actual monetary support for her to qualify her as a dependent.
Customer: replied 4 months ago.
If I didn't live with her she would have to hire help to be with her at least eight hours a day. Could this not be considered part of my monetary support?
Expert:  Law Educator, Esq. replied 4 months ago.

Thank you for your reply.

Unfortunately, no that cannot be considered part of your support, because you can still do work even though you may be there 8 hours a day to assist her according to the way the IRS thinks.

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