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Phillips Esq.
Phillips Esq., Attorney-at-Law
Category: Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 17530
Experience:  B.A.; M.B.A.; J.D.
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I am a military widow and cannot remarry or I lose my

Customer Question

I am a military widow and cannot remarry or I lose my military health insurance which I absolutely need. I have a Reverse Mortgage, a Homestead Exemption and a partner whom I trust to act on my wishes should I die. I cannot add him to my reverse mortgage because of the federal restriction to remarrying. I wish to arrange for him to be my sole beneficiary to my home. He meets the age requirement on the reverse mortgage and income level to be added to the homestead exemption.
I wish to develop a Revocable Living Trust stating this at a minimum but do not know how to achieve his remaining in the home until he dies or chooses to sell it and pay off the reverse mortgage at sale. We are prohibited of course, because we are not married but living as a married couple. We are both 68 years of age. In keeping with Nebraska and Federal Laws binding us, is there any hope this is something I can accomplish?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Estate Law
Expert:  Phillips Esq. replied 1 year ago.

You can put what you want done in a Will. Since the home cannot be transferred to a Trust with him as the sole beneficiary of the Trust, the next best alternative would be to put your wishes in a Will: that you devise the home to him to live there for life or sell and pay off the reverse mortgage.

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