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Christopher B, Esq
Christopher B, Esq, Attorney
Category: Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 2677
Experience:  Litigation Attorney with education focus on estate planning and tax
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My husband, who is recently deceased, and I own a timeshare

Customer Question

My husband, who is recently deceased, and I own a timeshare in Las Vegas. In March of 2011, I attempted to quit claim 50% of the timeshare to our son. The deed was recorded in Clark County.
The deed says that my (deceased) husband and I were granting 50% of the time share but says nothing about tennants-in-common or joint tennancy.
As part of my new estate planning, I am establishing a see-through trust for our son, which would include him ultimately receiving the entire timeshare under joint tenancy. My Colorado lawyer feels I may have incorrectly created the quit claim deed and would like for me to have a Nevada lawyer review it. I would like for things to be as easy as possible for my personal representative, when the time comes.
Suggestions, please.
Thank you, ***** *****
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Estate Law
Expert:  Christopher B, Esq replied 1 year ago.

Who owns the timeshare at this point, you or the trust? If you think things were not done correctly, you could simply have your son quitclaim the timeshare back to you and then you could quitclaim the deed to both you and your son as joint tenants with the right of survivorship. This would pass outside of probate and really does not have to be included in a trust if it is your intention to pass it to your son at your death. You could make sure things are done correctly and basically have a do over.

Please let me know if you have any further questions and please positively rate my answer as it is the only way I will be compensated for my time by the site. (There should be smiley faces or numbers from 1-5 next to my answer, an excellent or good rating would be fantastic.)

Expert:  Christopher B, Esq replied 1 year ago.

Just checking back in, do you have any further questions? If not, please positively rate my answer as it is the only way I will be compensated for my time by the site.

Expert:  Christopher B, Esq replied 1 year ago.

Any chance for a positive rating?

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