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Ask Barrister Your Own Question
Barrister
Barrister, Attorney
Category: Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 34309
Experience:  16 yrs estate law, real estate. Wills/Trusts/Probate
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How can I give my trust fund to my son

Customer Question

How can I give my trust fund to my son
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Estate Law
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.
Hello and welcome! My name is ***** ***** I will try my level best to help with your situation or get you to someone who can.
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Can you give me a few more details about your situation?
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Are you the beneficiary of a trust that was set up for you?
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If so, who is the trustee of the trust and who was the grantor (maker) of the trust?
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Are there any provisions in the trust about what happens to the trust assets if you were to pass away?
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thanks
Barrister
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Yes I'm the beneficiary of my mother trust but I'm on disability. But I would to give me what she left to my sound now. He takes care of me and it we be better for us he's 25
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I'm sorry I would like to give it to my son
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
My mother pass 3 years ago
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.
Ok, who is the trustee of the trust?
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And does it state what happens to the assets when you pass or if the trust terminates?
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thanks
Barrister
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
They have Stubeen trust company as the trustee
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Yes it says it goes to my son
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
So is there any thing I can do?
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.
Ok, then if you contact the trustee of the trust and tell them that you want to formally disclaim any interest in the trust, now and forever, then they may be able to assist with providing the written disclaimer form to do so. Once you disclaim any interest in the trust, it would have the legal effect of considering you to be deceased and the trust would pass to your son.
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If they won't assist, and this may be likely since they would no longer receive any fees for doing so, then you would need to contact a local estate law attorney for help in preparing the formal written signed and notarized disclaimer to deliver to them so that they would be obligated to transfer the trust assets to your son.
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thanks
Barrister
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Wow that's all I have to do. They wouldn't let me do that
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.
Yes, it doesn't surprise me that they wouldn't help because if the trust terminates, then their fees stop...and they don't like that.
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thanks
Barrister
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Omg this was so help I would start tomorrow
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.
You are very welcome. Glad to help any time. And I find that these trust management companies want to "milk the cow" as long as possible and are very hesitant to help with cutting off their source of funds..
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thanks
Barrister
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
It's a supplemental trust.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
And I can't find someone to help me
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.
Unfortunately, I am not allowed to recommend anyone personally under my agreement with JustAnswer. However, these are a couple sites that we attorneys actually use if we need foreign counsel in a state where we aren't licensed. Further, customers have consistently reported good results with these sites:
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www.martindale.com
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www.lawyers.com
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They screen their attorneys based on geographic location, area of practice, time in practice, cost and customer reviews.
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You would be looking for an estate law or trust attorney.
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thanks
Barrister

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