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lwpat
lwpat, Attorney at Law
Category: Estate Law
Satisfied Customers: 25386
Experience:  Attorney with experience in wills, estates and trusts
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we live on an heirship property where there are 10 different

Resolved Question:

we live on an heirship property where there are 10 different heirs for the land. we have lived on the spot we are on for 15 years and have paid the taxes on the whole heirship land by our selves we were wondering is their any kind of division laws for this type of situation where we could get the part that we live on as ours only.
Submitted: 7 years ago.
Category: Estate Law
Expert:  lwpat replied 7 years ago.

You could file an quiet title action or a claim for adverse possession and see what happens. Normally the court will hold that you are all tenants in common and you cannot file for adverse possession except in unusual circumstances. You can file a lien against the property for the taxes you have paid and then file for a foreclosure or either file for a partition action. The problem is that then all of the property is sold at the courthouse door.

 

While it is difficult, if you are in the financial position to by out at least some of the others, that is your best route.

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Expert:  lwpat replied 7 years ago.
One other option is to offer them a quit claim deed on the rest of the property in return for their quit claim deed to your ten acres. Again a difficult process but if you can get any of them to agree you are in a better position.

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