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khagihara
khagihara, Doctor
Category: Endocrinology
Satisfied Customers: 6488
Experience:  Trained in the multiple medical fields for many years.
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Is chronic fatigue syndrome real?

This answer was rated:

Is chronic fatigue syndrome real?

Yes. What is the reason you asked the question?

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
I was diagnosed with it back in 2001. Is it possible for it to come back?

Yes, it is possible. The short-term prognosis for recovery of function is generally poor in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The long-term prognosis may be better, although studies have been conflicting. In one report of 144 patients followed by questionnaire, for example, the proportion of patients with functional impairment was 73 percent at six weeks to six months and only 33 percent at two to four years. However, other studies noted a poorer outcome. A prospective study found that only 4 of 27 patients achieved sustained remission during a three-year observation period, and a retrospective evaluation of 495 patients with CFS or idiopathic chronic fatigue (unexplained debilitating fatigue lasting more than six months that does not fulfill criteria for CFS) reported symptomatic improvement in 64 percent at 1.5 years but complete resolution in only 2 percent. In the latter series, patients with CFS had a greater symptom severity and a lower level of functioning at follow-up than those with idiopathic chronic fatigue. Regardless of the long-term prognosis, neither CFS nor chronic fatigue results in organ failure or death.

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Hmm so I guess there is no sure way to know if it is CFS reoccurring or just a stressful lifestyle.

If you have the following symptoms, you are diagnosed to have CFS recurred.

Diagnosis requires that the patient have the following three symptoms:

  1. A substantial reduction or impairment in the ability to engage in pre-illness levels of occupational, educational, social, or personal activities that persists for more than six months and is accompanied by fatigue, which is often profound, is of new or definite onset (not lifelong), is not the result of ongoing excessive exertion, and is not substantially alleviated by rest; and
  2. Post-exertional malaise;* and
  3. Unrefreshing sleep*

At least one of the two following manifestations is also required:

  1. Cognitive impairment* or
  2. Orthostatic intolerance±

* Frequency and severity of symptoms should be assessed. The diagnosis of CFS/SEID should be questioned if patients do not have these symptoms at least half of the time with moderate, substantial, or severe intensity.
± Onset of symptoms when standing upright that are improved by lying back down

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
I'm trying to decide if that's my problem.

Which ones do you have?

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
The biggest thing is overwhelming fatigue.

Which ones do you have?

  1. A substantial reduction or impairment in the ability to engage in pre-illness levels of occupational, educational, social, or personal activities that persists for more than six months and is accompanied by fatigue, which is often profound, is of new or definite onset (not lifelong), is not the result of ongoing excessive exertion, and is not substantially alleviated by rest; and
  2. Post-exertional malaise
  3. Unrefreshing sleep
  4. Cognitive impairment
  5. Orthostatic intolerance (onset of symptoms when standing upright that are improved by lying back down)
Customer: replied 1 month ago.
What is considered cognitive impairment?
  • You forget things more often.
  • You forget important events such as appointments or social engagements.
  • You lose your train of thought or the thread of conversations, books or movies.
  • You feel increasingly overwhelmed by making decisions, planning steps to accomplish a task or interpreting instructions.
  • You start to have trouble finding your way around familiar environments.
  • You become more impulsive or show increasingly poor judgment.
  • Your family and friends notice any of these changes.
Customer: replied 1 month ago.
I am definitely experiencing those things.

Okay, you have 4. What else do you have?

Customer: replied 1 month ago.
Can you explain 1 in more simple terms?
You have problem at work, home, or school because of fatigue which is not improved with rest.
khagihara and other Endocrinology Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 1 month ago.
I do. Not enough energy to be majorly productive. I have to sit down often.

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