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Lucy, Esq.
Lucy, Esq., Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 27190
Experience:  Former judicial law clerk, lawyer
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What outside of work legal issue a employee is private to

Customer Question

What outside of work legal issue a employee is private to employer
Submitted: 2 months ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Lucy, Esq. replied 2 months ago.


I'm Lucy, and I'd be happy to answer your questions today.

Can you tell me more about your situation?

Customer: replied 2 months ago.
Didn't make it to work Shell. Did not call till after required attendance time. Used personal emergency ad excuse. Need to know what I can keep private from work
Expert:  Lucy, Esq. replied 2 months ago.

Ok, thank you.

You're not legally obligated to tell your employer why you were late for work. However, if you don't, they have a legal right to fire you. Employment is at will, and an employer has a right to terminate an employee at any time, even in right to work states like Texas. Not showing up or calling IS a valid reason for terminating someone, which means that if you have an excuse that would allow you to avoid being penalized, you have the burden of proving it. It comes down to whether keeping the information private is more important than your employer taking negative action against you. It could help to talk to someone in HR about their own confidentiality procedures before you proceed.

If you have any questions or concerns about my response, please reply WITHOUT RATING. It's important that you are 100% satisfied with my courtesy and professionalism. Otherwise, please rate my service positively so I am paid for the time I spend answering questions. If you are on a mobile device, you may need to scroll to the right. There is no charge for follow-up questions. Thank you.

Expert:  Lucy, Esq. replied 2 months ago.

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