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Loren, Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 28511
Experience:  More than 30 years in legal practice.
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It is just a bit of research I am in sales and am looking at

Customer Question

it is just a bit of research I am in sales and am looking at giving my two week notice. I am curious if I will get paid for the two weeks, because they will have me leave.
JA: When we are ready I'll take you to the appropriate web page.
Customer: thanks much
JA: Because laws vary from state to state, could you tell me what state is this in?
Customer: illinoid
JA: Have you talked to a lawyer yet?
Customer: illinoid
JA: Anything else you think the lawyer should know?
Customer: no
Submitted: 3 months ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Loren replied 3 months ago.

Good afternoon. I am Loren, an Illinois licensed attorney, and I look forward to assisting you.

Assuming no contractual provision to the contrary, there is no legal obligation that you give 2 weeks notice to resign. Nor is there a legal obligation the employer keep you on the job after you resign, if you do give advance notice.

However, if they do elect to keep you employed during the notice period then they have to pay you.

Expert:  Loren replied 3 months ago.

Did you have further questions? Have I answered your question?

Expert:  Loren replied 3 months ago.

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