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Ask Asad Rahman Your Own Question
Asad Rahman
Asad Rahman, Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 1718
Experience:  Practicing Attorney with 10 years experience
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I started working company Feb. 4, 2016, but during

Customer Question

I started working for this company Feb. 4, 2016, but during the time I had to take some time off due to my child's health issue. I informed this company and they was fine with the situation but afterwards had wanted to change me from W2 employee to 1099 due to my situation. Long story short, is it possible I can try to get unemployment if I was to get fired after changing to a 1099?
JA: Got it. The Employment Lawyer will know how to help you. Have you consulted a lawyer yet?
Customer: No
JA: Please tell me everything you can about this issue so the Employment Lawyer can help you best. Is there anything else the Employment Lawyer should be aware of?
Customer: I had to take like one day off every week due to my situation but I have also been working at home and long hours for any days missed to replace.
JA: OK. Got it. I'm sending you to a secure page on JustAnswer so you can place the $5 fully-refundable deposit now. While you're filling out that form, I'll tell the Employment Lawyer about your situation and then connect you two.
Submitted: 7 months ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Asad Rahman replied 7 months ago.
Generally you would not be entitled to unemployment but since you were converted from w2 to a 1099. You may not be eligible anyway as you have not worked for your employer long enough.

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