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Dwayne B.
Dwayne B., Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 32751
Experience:  Employment Law Expert
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After I had witness a discriminatory action and signed on as

Customer Question

After I had witness a discriminatory action and signed on as a witness. I began to be harassed less desirable assignments. Happen in June 2014 I became of aware of I reported to the EEO and to day they have not responded to me. they made it clear they represent Management. the Claim against they just wrote a letter stating they are still investigating.
Can a Local Goverment - Director discussed my employment status with an outsider. Can I seek legal action. May this be a civil rights issue. I understand I many not have the right to privacy from a private citizen. , but dont I have a right of privacy from the government. Director of Government agency I have a letter from the person stating what this Director indicating in essence I should look for another job and I better watch out.
Submitted: 11 months ago.
Category: Employment Law
Customer: replied 11 months ago.
I have two supervisors that this director confided and witness corroborated with Direct Supervisor.
Customer: replied 11 months ago.
This is NY at a NYC agency
Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 11 months ago.

Hello and thank you for contacting us. This is Dwayne B. and I’m an expert here and looking forward to assisting you today. If at any point any of my answers aren’t clear please don’t hesitate to ask for clarification. Also, I can only answer the questions you specifically ask and based on the facts that you give so please be sure that you ask the questions you want to ask and provide all necessary facts.

I would be happy to discuss this with you but I want to be sure you understand how the website works first.

Many times in employment law situations the law is not in favor of the employee. When that happens we have to give the person asking the question bad news. It's true, but sometimes it's not in their favor.

On this website the customer rates us experts at the end of the question and answer and every now and then a customer is unhappy about the law and gives a negative rating. Unfortunately, that negative rating is taken by the website to be a reflection on me, indicating that I wasn't polite, wasn't prompt, or provided a wrong answer.

I'm more than happy to discuss this with you, but I just wanted to make sure that you understood how the system works and that you will rate me on my professionalism and not on whether the law is in your favor or not, since I have no control over that.

With that understanding, do you want me to discuss this in more detail with you?

Customer: replied 11 months ago.
Hi Mr. Dwayne I didn't see the response yet I click on view I understand. I have a signed statement from the Government
agent (director NYC) that discuss personal information and gave a warning to the witness. I do believe personnel matters
are private and entitled to privacy. whether is true or not. I gave a signed statement to EEO they just sent me a letter stating
they were still investigating I just feel everytime I approach them I get more attention and management starts acting up.
also they start devising a pragmatic ruses to discredit me. I have more the a dozen witness that had testify to the EEO yet this
individual Director has not been held accountable.
Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 11 months ago.

So the director is harassing you because you are a witness to an incident being investigated by the EEOC?

Customer: replied 11 months ago.
I want to discuss in more detail.
Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 11 months ago.

Ok. Have you tried to file your own complaint with the EEOC?

Customer: replied 11 months ago.
with nyc agency eec its internal they only provided me with a letter saying they are still investigating. This depite the fact that was back in sept/oct 2014 this event that this government Director discuss my personnell matters this was also corroborated by a direct supervisor had bump into the witness an the witness told that the director had disclose to him. Where do i go fed or state i had filed with one of the underlyings for for sexual harrasment and was found guilty. i am college educated and have a professional license
Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 11 months ago.

There is no law that states it is illegal for the EEOC to discuss your matters with other people during its investigation, if that's the basis of your complaint (if it's not please let me know). It is often necessary for an investigator to disclose what other people have said or other issues to get corroboration or to develop the investigation.

However, if you still want to pursue the person even knowing there is no law against it then the next step would be to file a complaint with someone higher up in the EEOC, usually a regional director, or to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice through the office of the local U.S. Attorney. The U.S. Attorney usually only handles cases where there is a violation of law so they may just reject your complaint out of hand but they may choose to investigate first, they may find some other violation in their questioning of you, or they may refer you to another office.

Regardless, these are the steps to take to pursue your complaints. To pursue a lawsuit against the employer you have to allow the EEOC to complete their investigation of the employer and they will eventually either file suit for you, recommend mediation (which either side can reject), or send your what is known as a "right to sue" letter at which point you can file a lawsuit and pursue the employer through the courts.