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Patrick, Esq.
Patrick, Esq., Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 11272
Experience:  Significant experience in all areas of employment law.
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Can a lawyer from my company refuse my pay (I've been put on

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Can a lawyer from my company refuse my pay (I've been put on paid administrative leave). If I don't give him a name? I ended up giving the name because I felt threatened but can he do that? Now all the emails state I'm on paid administrative leave?
Submitted: 10 months ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Patrick, Esq. replied 10 months ago.

Hello and thank you for entrusting me to assist you. My name is ***** ***** I will do everything I can to answer your question.

Nobody can require you to do or say anything in order to get paid for wages you worked for and earned. However, if you are on administrative leave, you have no legal entitlement to be paid for that time, and so your employer can condition paying you for your leave on you cooperating with an investigation or giving a name. It sounds like that is what is happening here, and so there would be no legal violation in that case.

I hope that you find this information helpful and am genuinely sorry if it is not what you were hoping to hear. Please do not hesitate to let me know if you have any questions or concerns regarding the above and I will be more than happy to assist you further.

If you do not require any further assistance, please be so kind as to provide a positive rating of my service so that I may receive credit for assisting you. Very best wishes moving forward.

Expert:  Patrick, Esq. replied 10 months ago.

Are you still with me?

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