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Attorney2020
Attorney2020, Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 2577
Experience:  I have significant experience in employment law.
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I left an employer because they were violating their own

Customer Question

I left an employer because they were violating their own ethics and safety rules (documented), and they changed my compensation without cause. I told them that I saw that as a breach of contract concerning my relocation agreement, and that they needed
to abide by the original compensation or I would leave. The manager that had ethics and violence issues was forced into resignation due to an investigation started by my data. I was told by their representative, ***** ***** at HR, that if I needed to leave,
to do so and "do not worry about the relocation". This I took as the fact that their legal team (whom I also conferred with in writing) had determined to excuse my relocation debt. I told him of my intent to leave at that point because I saw no traction on
any of my concerns and considered the change in my compensation as a breach of contract, thereby nullifying the relocation term agreement. The employer never contacted me to verify the amount owed for relocation. They turned it over to a debt collector. The
amount is nearly twice what the original relocation payment was. (14k became 17795.63?) I told Cedar Financial to cease any and all phone contact and all correspondence would be in writing, either email or writing, and that they had 30 days to present me with
the originating documents, both the original contract and to whatever documentation covers the excess. They merely said the "validated" the debt. Shortly thereafter they tried to call me. I reminded them in writing of the earlier request of no phone contact
and that I would be seeking legal redress for the 1800$ per instance violation, and they subsequently threatened me in email as a response. Issue is, who do I sue first? My employer for falsifying a debt origination document, Cedar Financial, or both?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Attorney2020 replied 1 year ago.

Suing both companies would be sufficient as you appear to have claims against both companies rather than waiting to sue one and not the other. By suing both you could present both claims against both companies at he same time saving time, costs and energy.

I hope that helped. Please ask any follow-up questions. Please rate my answer so that I may be credited for my time. I thank you in advance for your cooperation.

Expert:  Attorney2020 replied 1 year ago.

I hope that helped. Please ask any follow-up questions. Please rate my answer so that I may be credited for my time. I thank you in advance for your cooperation. Thank you.

Expert:  Attorney2020 replied 1 year ago.

Please rate my answer so that I may be credited for my time. I thank you in advance for your cooperation. Thank you.

Expert:  Attorney2020 replied 12 months ago.

Please rate my answer so that I can be credited for my time. I thank you in advance for your cooperation. Thank you.