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Loren
Loren, Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 31394
Experience:  More than 30 years in legal practice.
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Am I eligible benfits after quitting my job?

Customer Question

Am I eligible for unemployment benfits after quitting my job?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  atluriram replied 1 year ago.

Sir,

I am ready to undertake the assignment. Please let me know deadline

with regards

RAMESH

Expert:  Loren replied 1 year ago.

As a general rule, true in all states, you are not eligible for unemployment benefits if you leave your job voluntarily and without "good cause".

Expert:  Loren replied 1 year ago.

What constitutes "good cause" is a fairly narrow range of reasons ranging from illegal discrimination or hostile work environment to decrease in pay or being changed from full time to part time.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
My resignation was brought about by a hostile work environment with unfair demands being made by management.
Expert:  Loren replied 1 year ago.

That would be considered good cause then.

Expert:  Loren replied 1 year ago.

If you have no further questions, please remember to rate my service to you so that I may close the question. Thanks.

Expert:  Loren replied 1 year ago.

Are you still there?

Expert:  Loren replied 1 year ago.

If you have no further questions, and have not yet done so, please remember to leave a favorable rating (Excellent or Good) so that I am credited for assisting you. A bonus is not required, but is always appreciated.

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