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Barrister
Barrister, Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 33719
Experience:  15 years practicing attorney
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If my supervisor is claiming derogatory information that I

Customer Question

If my supervisor is claiming derogatory information that I can proof is false, and my company refuses to acknowledge it, can I sue her personally for slander and defamation of character?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Barrister replied 1 year ago.

Hello and welcome! My name is ***** ***** I will try my level best to help with your situation or get you to someone who can.

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Yes, you could sue her for punitive damages if you can prove the elements of defamation and slander. If the comments she is making are untrue and are harming your reputation, you may have an action for slander and defamation. Defamation is considered any intentional false communication, either written or spoken, that harms a person's reputation; decreases the respect, regard, or confidence in which a person is held; or induces disparaging, hostile, or disagreeable opinions or feelings against a person.

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For a cause of action for slander/defamation you would have to prove damages and the following elements:

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a defamatory statement;

published to third parties; and

which the speaker or publisher knew or should have known was false.

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Additionally, if the person is engaging in this type behavior simply to annoy and disturb you, you could file criminal and civil charges for harassment.

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thanks

Barrister

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