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Dwayne B.
Dwayne B., Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 32325
Experience:  Employment Law Expert
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I worked at a large corporation (500 aprox.) employees

Customer Question

I worked at a large corporation (500 aprox.) employees for 9 months. After 3 months I was eligible and began paying for my health insurance (United health care) by getting my bi-weekly paycheck deducted. I recently, 3 weeks ago left my job voluntarily
due to mental health issues and also family issues. I want to retain my health insurance (everything the same) which I have been still using since I resigned. From what I understand there is something called COBRA that could allow me to keep my benefits by
paying them out of pocket? What do I do? Will my former employer send me something? Do I call them?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 1 year ago.

Hello and thank you for contacting us. This is Dwayne B. and I’m an expert here and looking forward to assisting you today. If at any point any of my answers aren’t clear please don’t hesitate to ask for clarification. Also, I can only answer the questions you specifically ask and based on the facts that you give so please be sure that you ask the questions you want to ask and provide all necessary facts. Further, if you get a message asking if you want to do additional services like a telephone call that message is automatically generated by the website and is not sent from me. I, like most of the experts in the Legal categories, do not do telephone calls due to issues with State Bar rules and other concerns.

Your employer should provide you with the COBRA information upon your leaving employment. Usually that notice comes from the Plan Administrator which may be another employee, someone from a third party company, etc.

If you haven't heard from the employer within a week or so then send them a letter by certified mail, return receipt requested explaining that you haven't received your COBRA notice and that you want to sign up for COBRA and requesting that they provide the appropriate documents. Be sure and send it CMRRR so you can prove it was sent and they received the notice in case they mess something up.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
whats CMRRR mean, and where should I send it to their corporate headquaters?
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
How long does it typically take these COBRA documents to be sent to me? and are they required by law to do so?
Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 1 year ago.

Certified Mail, Return Receipt Requested.

They are required by law to send them to you. I don't remember how long they have and it can vary slightly. I'll look that up for you.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Thanks!
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
that starts from the day that I was officially taken out of their system right?
Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 1 year ago.

COBRA allows employers 30 days to inform the COBRA administrator of a qualifying event and then the COBRA administrator has up to 14 days to mail the COBRA Specific Rights Notice to you so that would be a total of 44 days from the last day of work, plus an additional few days for the mail (usually three to ten days)

Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 1 year ago.

It starts from the date you leave the company, not the last date you are actually, physically there. Some people quit and then take their vacation time before they actually leave the company so the time in a situation like that wouldn't start until after the vacation time had passed.

Expert:  Dwayne B. replied 1 year ago.

The easiest way to think of it is the time starts when you are no longer an employee.

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