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Allen M., Esq.
Allen M., Esq., Employment Lawyer
Category: Employment Law
Satisfied Customers: 19135
Experience:  Employment/Labor Law Litigation
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I am a salaried employee, red to work at a specific

Customer Question

I am a salaried employee, hired to work at a specific location. While at that location, I was blamed for making a mistake that almost cost the company money and a client. The VP told the district manager to tell me that my new job would be 10 to 12 hours a day and involve every weekend. While all that was a potential when I took the job, it is now mandatory and in my view punishment. Is this ok for them to do? What can I do in this situation?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Employment Law
Expert:  Allen M., Esq. replied 1 year ago.

Unfortunately yes, it is legal. There is nothing illegal about an employer acting in punishment unless they are retaliating against someone for making a complaint that is protected (like a complaint of discrimination based race, religion, gender, age, disability or FMLA use...or if the employee is a whistleblower under OSHA, the Department of Labor, Sarbanes-Oxley or some other specific statute).

As a salaried employee, it also isn't illegal to make hours mandatory....even that number of hours.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Is there a maximum number of hours I have to work? Is there a maximum number of days I have to work?
Expert:  Allen M., Esq. replied 1 year ago.

Not under federal law, as it pertains to salaried employees.

Your state does have its own law that is called the One Day in Seven Rest law, but it specifically exempts salaried employees under the FLSA too.

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