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Kevin
Kevin, Licensed Electrician
Category: Electrical
Satisfied Customers: 2952
Experience:  29 years as a Licensed Electrical Contractor in Illinois, 5 year college Electrical Instructor, Former Electrical Inspector, Diploma in Digital Electronics, Former Illinois Licensed Home Inspector
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I am a retired carpenter/builder and recently removed a

Customer Question

I am a retired carpenter/builder and recently removed a countertop for a friend who is replacing same. There is a 4 burner cook top in the counter and a single built in oven in the wall. I am not an electrician but recognize issues with wiring. Here is what someone did. The 50 amp 3 conductor romex wire comes through a hole in the drywall, drapes in a 12"inch loop and enters a metal box Attached to stud behind drywall but mounted on surface of dry wall) romex secured with a proper clamp to box. The wires from the oven are in flex for only part of the run and then the insulated conductors exit the flex and pass directly into the box (no flex cable or proper clamp last 10 " or so. Also the flex from the stove top enters the box with no clamp. All leads were connected inside box red/red, black/black, white to bare copper conductor. I shut off breaker and removed cook top (to be replaced) oven to be re-connected. Is it acceptable to have both the stove top and single oven in 1 box and connected to the 3 wire supply as long as the leads are in flex and attached to the box with flex clamps. And is the romex ok coming through the drywall attached only to the box. I built and wired my own home but am reluctant to help my friend but he had what I consider to be some dangerous conditions. Thanks for any suggestions. And because of high season can't get anyone in to check it out. Thanks,
Bill d
Submitted: 4 months ago.
Category: Electrical
Expert:  Kevin replied 4 months ago.

Hello and welcome to Just Answer. My name is ***** ***** I will be happy to assist you with your electrical question.

1) Based on your comments, there are few code violations as follows:

A) NM Romex needs to be protected and cannot be exposed. Either needs to be installed in a flexible metal conduit or EMT conduit, or better yet, just install individual conductors into a Flex metal conduit (Greenfield) and forget the Romex cable.

B) All cables and/or raceways entering or leaving a metal wall box need to have the proper clamps.

2) What you have in place is called a "tap connection" which is code compliant and a common installation. The wattage of the cooktop and oven determines the size of the double pole feeder breaker using a factor within the NEC. A 50 amp breaker is a very common size used in a tap connection. The cooktop and oven are basically sharing the same 50 amp circuit and this is code compliant.

Customer: replied 4 months ago.
Slightly confused about the romex nm, it is behind the wall (as most romex) and enters the cabinet space through a hole punched in the sheetrock then to the metal junction box. What is the easiest way to rotect the romex without running new conductors from the panel?
Expert:  Kevin replied 4 months ago.

1) If the Romex is installed behind drywall, then it is protected and no corrective action required.

2) If the Romex enters into a storage cabinet area, I consider that as a code violation since the cabinet can be used for kitchen storage and it needs to be protected since it is exposed cable.

3) Where the Romex exits the drywall, install an accessible remodel type box with a blank metal cover that has a knockout and then extend the circuit into the cabinet area with Greenfield (flexible metal conduit). Secure the Greenfield with approved type of clamps.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks............Kevin:)

Expert:  Kevin replied 4 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks............Kevin:)

Expert:  Kevin replied 4 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks.............Kevin:)

Expert:  Kevin replied 4 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks.............Kevin:)

Expert:  Kevin replied 4 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks...............Kevin:)

Expert:  Kevin replied 4 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks.............Kevin:)

Customer: replied 4 months ago.
Sorry for the delay, same question, can I slip steel flex over the exposed romex with an appropriate flex clamp where it enters the steel box or is it preferable to move the box over the romex where it enters the cabinet space through the sheetrock. Thanks.
Expert:  Kevin replied 4 months ago.

1) The greenfield (flexible metal conduit) can be used as a sleeve to protect the Romex along with the appropriate flexible metal conduit clamp.

2) The greenfield will also require an anti-short bushing at each end to protect the Romex cable from abrasion on the ends of the FMC.

Expert:  Kevin replied 3 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks.............Kevin:)

Expert:  Kevin replied 3 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks.............Kevin:)

Customer: replied 3 months ago.
Last question about this circuit, the new stove top has 3 wires (red, black and bare) same as the supply. Obviously like wires together in the junction box, red/red, black/black, bare/bare. Assuming there should be a bare attached to the metal junction box to the other bare wires, feed and appliance.
Expert:  Kevin replied 3 months ago.

1) Cooktops are either rated for a combo of 120 & 240 volts or only 240 volts. If only red and black wires and no white neutral wire, then the wires get spliced color to color.

2) All metal boxes are required to be grounded. The bare copper ground needs to terminate to a green ground screw on the back of the metal box.

Expert:  Kevin replied 3 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks.............Kevin:)

Expert:  Kevin replied 3 months ago.

If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you.

Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off.

Thanks...............Kevin:)

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