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Kevin
Kevin, Licensed Electrician
Category: Electrical
Satisfied Customers: 2934
Experience:  29 years as a Licensed Electrical Contractor in Illinois, 5 year college Electrical Instructor, Former Electrical Inspector, Diploma in Digital Electronics, Former Illinois Licensed Home Inspector
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I need to extend a gfci protected outlet from a wall. In the

Customer Question

I need to extend a gfci protected outlet from a wall. In the wall it was two duplex outlets. I removed them and have two white wires and two black. I want to extend the power to a base unit some distance from the wall. So I wrapped the two white wires and connected to the extension wire (3 wire bundle), same with black. Then connected to duplex outlet in a base unit. When I flipped the breaker, it won't set, so I'm doing something wrong. Help please. Tracy
Submitted: 7 months ago.
Category: Electrical
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
Hello and welcome to Just Answer. My name is ***** ***** I will be happy to assist you with your electrical question. 1) That's because you have the LINE and LOAD side reversed at the GFCI. 2) Do you have a 2 wire lead AC voltage tester or an AC voltmeter to confirm the always hot (LINE side) wires.....hot and neutral?
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
see my pics. first are the four wires. These are not gfci outlets that were there, regular type. GFCI is further down the wall. Second pic are the extension wires. 3rd is the area in general.I do have an AC voltmeter. So how do I test?
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
hello?
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
Thanks for the replies and the pics 1) The always live hot and neutral wires need to be identified. Set the meter to the AC voltage setting and the 200V range. With the meter and the circuit breaker in the ON position, locate the live hot/neutral wire pair for a constant 120 volts.
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
ok i found the black and white wire that was closest to the gfci outlet side was hot
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
ok now what
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
ok so do i connect the black and wire connect wire to the hot side of gfci wires? what do i connect on the duplex outlet. I saw in a diagram the black wire should go to the line side, and the white wire to the load side?
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
kevin are you there?
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
1) A GFCI contains a LINE and a LOAD side. Each wire pair also contains a hot and a neutral. Thus, in order to protect downstream receptacles that are GFCI protected, the GFCI will have 4 wire terminations...... ie...... 1 hot/neutral always live pair on the LINE side and then a hot/neutral to the LOAD side that connect to the downstream receptacles. 2) Refer to the diagram shown below where a GFCI is protecting a downstream duplex receptacle.
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
So instead of one three wire extension, as I show in my pic, I'll need two? one for the load side and one from line side to continue the run?
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
Yes, if you want to protect downstream duplex receptacles from a GFCI receptacle, the GFCI requires 1 hot and 1 neutral on the LINE side (always live) and 1 hot and 1 neutral on the LOAD side. Thus a total of 4 wires.... ie.....2 hots and 2 neutrals. Just like as illustrated in the diagram.
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
ok thank you
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
Once you insert a GFCI receptacle, you can insert the required quantity of regular duplex receptacles and parallel them with each other. Thus, all downstream regular duplex receptacles will now be GFCI protected due to the LOAD side termination. Reply back and let me know if you are able to get the receptacles working OK and if the GFCI is able to properly trip and rest OK?
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
Here is a diagram showing 1 GFCI protecting 2 downstream duplex receptacles. All 3 receptacles in this diagram are now GFCI protected.
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
Does this diagram help?
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you. Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off. Thanks..............Kevin:)
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
Ok I'm a little confused now. I wanted you to understand the duplexes I took out were in the middle of a line of duplexes from a gfci. You mentioned in this situation I could wire them in parallel. So if that is case, do I still need to have two sets of hot/neutral wires? I made a diagram to show they way it looks. I guess what I'm trying to find out is if there's an easier way to wire the duplex, such as in parallet, then the four wires.
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
If you want the GFCI to protect any downstream regular duplex receptacles, the GFCI must contain the always live circuit........a hot wire and a neutral wire which is terminated to the GFCI LINE side connection. All receptacles that are daisy chained from one to the next are always wired in a parallel fashion. A middle of the run receptacle will require 2 hots and 2 neutrals........ie....... 1 hot and 1 neutral feeding the receptacle and another hot and neutral leaving the receptacle to feed the next downstream receptacle. Think of it this way......a GFCI wired upstream of other regular duplex receptacles on the circuit is the master and the downstream regular duplex receptacles are the slaves. Just like the previous diagram I posted. A GFCI receptacle can be installed in any portion of the circuit.....ie..... whether a" home run receptacle" or a "middle of the run" or an "end of the run" receptacle box. The key item is that a GFCI must have an always live circuit feed to it's LINE side. All you need to do is to install the GFCI at the 1st wall box that contains the live circuit feed and then daisy chain the remaining downstream receptacles . Daisy chaining is the same thing as wiring in parallel. If you look at the diagram I sent, the 2 regular duplex receptacles are daisy chained and all wired in parallel with each other. If you removed duplexes and they are no longer required, then splice the 2 blacks together and the 2 whites together in that wall box. This will then provide a "feed thru" to the next downstream receptacle box.
Customer: replied 7 months ago.
ok so 2 hots and two neutrals. I'm headed to the supply store. I'll let you know how it works out.
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
OK, very good.
Expert:  Kevin replied 7 months ago.
If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you. Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off. Thanks...................Kevin:)
Expert:  Kevin replied 6 months ago.
If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you. Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off. Thanks..............Kevin:)
Expert:  Kevin replied 6 months ago.
If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you. Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off. Thanks..............Kevin:)
Expert:  Kevin replied 6 months ago.
If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you. Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off. Thanks............Kevin:)
Expert:  Kevin replied 6 months ago.
If you have any additional questions, just let me know and I’ll be glad to answer them for you. Otherwise, don’t forget to rate me before you log Off. Thanks............Kevin:)

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