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Kevin
Kevin, Licensed Electrical Contractor
Category: Electrical
Satisfied Customers: 3473
Experience:  30 years Licensed Electrical Contractor in Illinois, Adjunct College Electrical Instructor, Former Electrical Inspector, Diploma: Digital Electronics, FCC Technician License
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I have an receptical in our kitchen that continually blows

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I have an receptical in our kitchen that continually blows the circuit if more than one appliance is plugged in and sometimes when only one appliance is plugged in. Could it be the breaker that is faulty?

Hello Art.........my name is XXXXX XXXXX I will be happy to assist you with your electrical question. My goal is to exceed your expectations on Just Answer!

 

1) What types of appliances are typically plugged into this circuit?

 

2) Is this circuit a kitchen counter top 20 amp circuit? Does it have GFCI protection either using a GFCI receptacle or a GFCI circuit breaker?

 

3) How many receptacles are on this circuit? If more than 1 receptacle is on the circuit, can you plug the appliance into another receptacle that is on the same circuit to determine if the breaker still trips? In other words, does the trouble follow or does the trouble go away?

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Hi Kevin;


I just looked at the breaker and it is a Split (with 2 breakers) and the only things plugged in are a toaster and electric kettle. I'm not sure what else is on the split and don't think they are GFCI.

Thank you for the replies Art.

 

1) The type of breaker that you are referring to is a tandem or mini breaker. It installs on the panel as a full size breaker but is split into 2 smaller breakers as you mention.

 

2) Depending upon the age of the home, kitchen counter tops require (2) two dedicated 20 amp circuits and also need to be GFCI protected.

 

How old is the home?

 

What is the amperage of the breaker that the receptacles are connected to? Is the tandem breaker 15/15 or 15/20 or 20/20 amps?

 

Have the toaster and kettle worked properly on this receptacle and the problem recently started?

 

3) How many receptacles are on this circuit? If more than 1 receptacle is on the circuit, can you plug the appliance into another receptacle that is on the same circuit to determine if the breaker still trips? In other words, does the trouble follow or does the trouble go away?

 

4) We will need confirmation if the receptacle is GFCI protected or not. If the receptacle is GFCI protected, it is possible that the GFCI tripped and the circuit breaker did not? You would need to confirm.

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

As I stated, I do not know the amperage of the breakers and this has been going on for some time. The house is 26 years old. I think that this recepticle is dedicated to the split because when it trips, nothing else in the kitchen goes out.

1) The house is not that old and should have GFCI protection in the kitchen counter top receptacles. The problem may or may not be a GFCI issue.

 

2) If you feel comfortable in working inside a live electrical panel, you can locate the circuit breaker that the existing circuit trips on and temporarily swing this circuit hot over to another breaker of the same amperage. At the secondary breaker, you will need to temporarily remove the existing hot wire and install the hot wire from the kitchen that is tripping. This is one method to prove if the problem is within the breaker and if the problem follows or goes away. If the problem goes away, then the breaker is faulty and needs replacement. If the problem stays, then either the appliances are too much wattage and overloading the circuit or there are some wiring issues such as a short circuit or ground fault.

 

 

 

 

Hope this helps.........If you have any additional questions, let me know and I'll be glad to answer them for you.

 

Otherwise, don't forget to rate me before you log Off.

The next time you have an electrical question, you can also request for me at: http://www.justanswer.com/home-improvement/expert-your-electrician
..........Thanks..............Kevin!



 

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