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Inactive, Master Electrician
Category: Electrical
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Experience:  Electrical Contractor
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How can I extend my main service to a new panel in another

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How can I extend my main service to a new panel in another part of my house? My current 200 amp panel is full and I want to create a new panel for my shop.
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Are you planning on running a new panel to your shop? Or are you going to run all your wiring from your main panel location?


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Customer: replied 8 years ago.
I thought about p[utting in a sub panel, but my main panel is already very full and I have already installed several slim breakeers to make room for other circuits when I wired in the new kitchen. I want to have about 60-80 amps available toset up seperate circuits so I can run multiple power tools and power equipment at the same time.
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Ok here is what you need to do to make room in the main 200amp panel.

  1. Setup a subpanel directly next to the main panel.
  2. Make it a 50amp subpanel
  3. Take 4 breakers currently in the main panel and move them to the new small sub
  4. Install a 50amp breaker to feed the new subpanel
  5. Then install a 100amp breaker for your new sub to the shop.

Now when you do this - both panels will need to be setup as subpanels. What this means is that you will need to install grounding kits in both panels and keep your neutrals and grounding wires separated.

Here is an example of how to do this:
graphic


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Customer: replied 8 years ago.
One last thing, what if the wires for the circuits I want to move out of the main panel to the sub panel are too short to move to the subpanel? Can they be spliced?
Joseph is offline at the moment so allow me to give you a hand.
Yes they can be spliced. This is common when doing upgrades and additions like this. Remove them from the existing panel and run them to a junction box above. You might run conduit to this box or individual cables depending on how many circuits and such. There is no set rule on feeding the junction box.
Joseph will be back online a bit later if you have more for him. When you are satisfied with the answers here please accept his answer, not mine. I am just assisting him in his absense. Thank you.
Customer: replied 8 years ago.
Thanks for your help, I thought this was the right answer but wanted to make sure that it woudl be acceptable if the house is inspected when i sell it.
If you do electrical work like this the code may require you to have the work inspected now. I don't know where you live but here in Michigan it would be required to have a permit and have the work inspected. Then you will know a "home inspector" won't have a problem with the work at the time of a sale.
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Sorry I left that part out. Yes just splice them and youll be fine. But what you also want to do is bring the entire cable assembly over to the new panel. What I mean by this is: A cable assembly (in your case) is black - white and ground. All the wires associated with that black wire will need to go to the new panel. The reason is that you have to have all the wiring terminated in the same panel. You dont want the breaker in one panel with its associated neutrals and grounds in another.

As for setting up the panel - if you have room right beside the existing one, just put a 2" chase nipple between them and set it up like that. This would mean the panels would be only spaced about 6" apart and much easier to do the work you need.

Here is an example of what I mean:
graphic

  • If you need further clarification on anything I posted, please dont hesitate to ask
  • 100% customer satisfaction is my goal
Inactive, Master Electrician
Category: Electrical
Satisfied Customers: 4772
Experience: Electrical Contractor
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