How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Law Educator, Esq. Your Own Question
Law Educator, Esq.
Law Educator, Esq., Attorney
Category: Education Law
Satisfied Customers: 111449
Experience:  Attorney handling education matters.
10285032
Type Your Education Law Question Here...
Law Educator, Esq. is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

I was employed at a startup biotech company years. When

Customer Question

Customer: I was employed at a startup biotech company for 3 years. When offer of employment was made, I rejected it because of low salary offer. As a counter offer, company offered twice a year OPPORTUNITY to earn 20% bonus, i.e. every six month. Whenever I asked for bonus, the employer did not give a clear answer. Since they were tight on funding, I showed a gentleman gesture and said pay me when funding comes in. I never waived my rights to bonus. ON Dec 30th unexpected, company terminated my employment and claim that bonus was an opportunity not a commitment. I mentioned that I asked for it a few times and it was company fault not to discuss it, decide conditions and pay it. It seems now that it was never their intention to pay bonus which they mentioned in the employment contract. It could total to $160,000.00. Company is offering $5000 as severance and asking me to sign a termination letter to wave all the rights. I refused.
JA: Thanks. Can you give me any more details about your issue?
Customer: I was employed at a startup biotech company for 3 years. When offer of employment was made, I rejected it because of low salary offer. As a counter offer, company offered twice a year OPPORTUNITY to earn 20% bonus, i.e. every six month. Whenever I asked for bonus, the employer did not give a clear answer. Since they were tight on funding, I showed a gentleman gesture and said pay me when funding comes in. I never waived my rights to bonus. ON Dec 30th unexpected, company terminated my employment and claim that bonus was an opportunity not a commitment. I mentioned that I asked for it a few times and it was company fault not to discuss it, decide conditions and pay it. It seems now that it was never their intention to pay bonus which they mentioned in the employment contract. It could total to $160,000.00. Company is offering $5000 as severance and asking me to sign a termination letter to wave all the rights. I refused. I reside in the State of Massachusetts. Do I have a case to sue the company?
JA: OK got it. Last thing — JustAnswer charges a fee (generally around $18) to post your type of question to Education Law Experts (you only pay if satisfied). There are a couple customers ahead of you. Are you willing to wait a bit?
Customer: yes
JA: OK. Now I'm going to take you to a page to place a secure deposit with JustAnswer. Don't worry, this chat is saved. After that, we will finish helping you.
Submitted: 11 months ago.
Category: Education Law
Expert:  Law Educator, Esq. replied 11 months ago.
Thank you for your question. I look forward to working with you to provide you the information you are seeking for educational purposes only.
If they agreed to your counter offer, which you indicate they did as you went to work for them, then they are bound to that contractual agreement with you. If they are not honoring that agreement and are not paying you the bonus you agreed upon, then you have grounds to sue them for breach of that contract for all of the money that you are due. You need to send them a letter in response to the severance offer and tell them that they are in breach of contract and how much they owe you and that if they do not pay you will pursue them for willful and malicious breach of contract and seek all damages including costs and attorney's fees for having to file suit against them for their breach of contract with you.

Related Education Law Questions