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Jane Lefler
Jane Lefler, Animal Behaviorist
Category: Dog Training
Satisfied Customers: 19543
Experience:  Behaviorist /Trainer and Dog breeder 18+ years
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We have temporarily moved into a townhouse with a very small

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We have temporarily moved into a townhouse with a very small patch of grass (while building a house) and my Mini-Poodle is exhibiting new / bad behavior about peeing. He will go outside with me and my toy poodle, do nothing then come inside and pee on the floor. He is 7 years old and housetrained. He will stand there and look at the grass for as long as 3 hours...... It's very unpredictable, sometimes he will go outside and other times he just stands there. This has been going on for several months. I got him from a breeder when he was 4, he is a champion, and will not go at all on leash. He has a lot of anxieties about noises but nothing specific seems to correlate to this behavior. I can't walk him to go potty cause he won't go on leash and he won't go half the time when I let him out (which is often), so I don't know what to do.
Hi JaCustomer,.My name is Jane. I have been working professionally with animals especially dogs in both health and behavioral issues for over 18 years. I have over 14,000 satisfied customers. It will be my pleasure to work with you today. .In order to supply you with the best information, I do need to ask for some additional information. Once I receive your answer, it will likely take me about 30-45 minutes to type up your response. I hope you can be patient. .You say he doesn't mark and will stand right in front of you and urinate. So does he squat before urinating or does it just seem to come out?I do know that submission urination is tiny small amounts in most cases.Is he drinking more than he used to?Do you know if dogs used to live in this apartment before you moved in?Is there any particular place that he is going in?Does he have a clear signal to use to indicate he needs to go out?What are you cleaning up with?Is the area carpeted, porous or sealed flooring?
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

He stretches out a little, doesn't actually squat. He is not drinking more than he used to. No dogs lived here before and they put in brand new carpet before we moved in. He does not go in the same place every time. This morning it was while coming up the stairs, all the way across the living room and into the bedroom. He does signal that he needs to go out, he stands in front of me and stares at me, when I ask him if he wants to go out, he jumps up and spins around and runs to the door. Then he just stands there outside about 50% of the time. The floor is new carpet. low pile textured. And I clean up with water and shop vac.

Laura,
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Thanks for the additional information. It is helpful. I asked about pets because if a dog lived there in the past and urinated on the floors, it can seep down into the padding and even into the subflooring underneath the carpet and padding. If not cleaned with an enzymatic cleaner and sealed for subflooring, it can draw a dog to urinate there.
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Additionally cleaning with just water and a shop vac doesn't remove the odor. It may remove it well enough to fool a human nose as will many cleaners, but a dog's nose is much more sensitive and can still smell the faint odor of urine. The only way to get the odor removed is to use an enzymatic cleanser and be sure it soaks in a little longer than the original urine before blotting it up or pulling it back up. Enzymatic cleaners actually break down the protein to allow the odor to be removed enough that even the dog doesn't detect it. So you will want to do that to ensure no odor remains. You might also get one of the special lights from the hardware store that shows up the stains.
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You might also get him checked over medically. A dog with a Urinary tract infection can have problems holding their urine. Common symptoms of a urinary tract infection are frequent urination, dribbling urine, blood in the urine, squatting frequently to urinate, strong odor to the urine, inappropriate urination and straining to urinate as well as an increase in fluid intake. A dog with a UTI does not always show all the symptoms and typically displays 2 or 3. I believe you need to have your Vet check your dog out so it can get medication for the problem if your dog is displaying 2 or more of the above symptoms.. He does have inappropriate urination and dribbling even though you think that is from fear or submission, it is worth checking.
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Male dogs can also become incontinent and the bladder sphincter just isn't as strong as it used to be. . If this is the case, there are medications that your vet can prescribe to help with the problem if it gets to be more of an issue. You can read about this here:

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/urinary_incontinence.html

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There is a product called a belly band that helps with this issue in a male dog. You can see these here:

http://www.heartoftexasgreyhounds.com/bellyband.htm

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I would try to give him a better signal to use to get your attention for when he has to urinate or defecate. Put a bell or other noise maker on the door low enough for the dog to reach. Each time you take the dog out, ring the bell. The dog will associate ringing the bell with going out and one day ring the bell to signal to you that he needs to go out. This takes the guess work out of it and if you are busy, you will hear the bell.

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If a medical cause is ruled out, you might want to retrain him again. I would do crate training as it prevents them from going on the floors and it also teaches them that they have to go out when you take them outside. You can reward them eliminating outside with tasty treats like hot dog slices or liver slivers. With crate training they also are rewarded with time outside the crate when they eliminate outside. Initially keep that time down to like 30 minutes out of the crate when they eliminate outside. Here is a site on crate training.

http://www.inch.com/~dogs/cratetraining.html

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You might also feed and water on a set schedule keeping a log of the times he eats and drinks and when he urinates and defecates. Most dogs have a schedule and if you can figure out his schedule, you can plan on having him outside those times he is most likely to have to go.

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You might also try leashing him to you so that you can see when he starts to lean forward a bit and then give a little tug and firm NO and take him outside. If he won't eliminate with a leash on, perhaps letting him trail it in the house will be enough to prevent the urination.

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I hope this information is helpful to you and you are satisfied with my response. If you would like any additional information or have more questions please don’t hesitate to press the reply to expert or continue conversation button so I can address any issues you still have .

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Just a quick follow up to see if you had a chance to try any of my suggestions. I hope you found my suggestions helpful.

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