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Ask Dr. Michael Salkin Your Own Question
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin, Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 23743
Experience:  University of California at Davis graduate veterinarian with 44 years of experience
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All of a sudden my dog is wobbling, almost like he's dizzy.

Customer Question

Hi there, all of a sudden my dog is wobbling, almost like he's dizzy. We took him out for a walk and he was acting very lazy and lethargic. We got back inside and he drank a good amount of water and now he is laying down, but he looks lethargic.
JA: I'm sorry to hear that. Could be a lot of things that cause lethargy. The Veterinarian will know how to help your dog. What is the dog's name and age?
Customer: His name is***** is 6 months old.
JA: Is there anything else the Veterinarian should be aware of about Kuma?
Customer: No. He's healthy. Had all of his shots. No issues.
Submitted: 2 months ago.
Category: Dog Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 2 months ago.

I'm sorry to hear of this with Kuma. How long did the "wobbling, dizzy" phase last, please?

Customer: replied 2 months ago.
It's been going on for about a half hour and it's still going. He's stumbling around too. As far as we know he hasn't gotten into anything.
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 2 months ago.

If we can rule out an intoxication by drug, chemical or insecticide, a complex partial seizure should be considered. This is described as abnormal focal or asymmetric sensory or motor activity affecting any part of the body and which may be associated with autonomic signs, (salivation, vomiting, e.g.) and is associated with a change in mentation (mental status) and/or behavioral abnormalities. Sleep is the most common post-ictal (post-seizure) symptom. Mark your calendar for this event and for just what you witnessed. Kuma's vet will need all the information you can gather when deciding if Kuma should be prescribed an anticonvulsive drug. Most of us will accept one mild (lasting less than 5 minutes, no thrashing about, no loss of consciousness) event monthly before prescribing such a drug. Should Kuma suffer another event within 24 hours of this one clustering is diagnosed and that may presage status epilepticus - the state in which seizure activity doesn't abate unless I heavily sedate or anesthetize my patient. He would then need the attention of a vet at your earliest convenience.

Seizures first arising up to 5 years of age are usually considered idiopathic (unknown cause) epilepsy. Seizures arising after 6 years of age are often caused by brain tumor or, less commonly, adult onset epilepsy. I need you to check his vital signs for me, please...

1) Check his gum and tongue color. They should be nicely pink - not whitish (anemia) or bluish/greyish (cyanosis/hypoxia/lack of oxygen to his tissues).

2) Check his respiratory rate at rest. He should be taking less than 30 breaths/minute while asleep or at rest.

3) Take his rectal temperature. Any body thermometer will do when placed 1.5" into his rectum for 1 minute. Normal is 100.5-102.5F. This is a two person job!

Please let me know what you find.

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