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Ask Dr. Michael Salkin Your Own Question
Dr. Michael Salkin
Dr. Michael Salkin, Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 24385
Experience:  University of California at Davis graduate veterinarian with 44 years of experience
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My dog has been sleeping a lot, not uncommon on 14 years I

Customer Question

my dog has been sleeping a lot, not uncommon for going on 14 years I think. she is a 5 pound yorkie..eating and drinking normally...she just had about a 2 min long shaking and frothed at the mouth...seems to be fine now
Submitted: 11 months ago.
Category: Dog Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Michael Salkin replied 11 months ago.

I believe you've described a partial seizure which is defined as sensory or motor activity affecting any part of the body and which can be associated with autonomic signs (salivation, vomiting,e.g.). If there were a change in mentation (mental status) or behavior I would further qualify the partial seizure as a complex one. Intracranial (within the skull) disorders such as brain tumor at Ashley's age need to be considered. Extracranial (outside the skull) disorders such as a poorly functioning liver intoxicating the brain are important differential diagnoses as well. Please alert Ashley's vet as to what you witnessed. Her vet is likely to want to thoroughly examine Ashley including diagnostics in the form of blood and urine tests. There's no need to have her see a vet at this time unless another seizure arises within a 24 hour period. This is called clustering and is dangerous; it often presages status epilepticus - the state in which seizure activity doesn't abate without my heavily sedating or anesthetizing my patient.

Please respond with further questions or concerns if you wish.

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