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Dr. Deb
Dr. Deb, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 9778
Experience:  I have been a practicing veterinarian for over 30 years.
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Miniature schnautzer male has tiny raised spots on s back

Customer Question

miniature schnautzer male has tiny raised spots on his back which he tries to reach. The spots are powdery when scratched. Vet thinks it may be fleas! I wonder about anal gland problem. Help.
Submitted: 1 year ago via Dog-Health-Guide.
Category: Dog Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 1 year ago.

Hello, I'm Dr. Deb and will do my best to help you today.

I'm sorry for this concern for Basil. I do have a few additional questions to ask about him first, if you don't mind:

1. How long has he had this skin condition?

2. Are these raised spots only located on his back?

3. Do you think you could send me a picture of them. This link ( http://ww2.justanswer.com/how-do-i-send-photo-or-file-expert) walks you through the process.

4. Has your vet done any tests such as skin scrapings, or fungal cultures?

There may be a slight delay after I receive your answers since I have to type up a response to you. Thanks for your patience. Deb

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Some weeks
Yes
Not possible to see without roughing up hair
No. vet considered unnecessary. I have increased Omega 3 and hope problem will disappear. Thank you.
Expert:  Dr. Deb replied 1 year ago.

Thanks for the answers to my questions.

I understand about not being able to take a picture but in the absence of being able to view his skin (or even if I was able to view it), I can only speculate as to what might be going on.

Since the lesions are only located on his back and no where else on his body, the following conditions are ones which I''d want to consider:

1. Schnauzer Comedome Syndrome which is believed to be an inherited skin condition which affects the hair follicles. Unfortunately, this is not a curable condition but rather one which is controlled. The patient can become itchy especially if a secondary bacterial infection develops so antibiotics are usually needed.

Treatment options include:

  • Antiseptic/antiseborrheic shampoos containing sulfur, sulfur and tar, or benzoyl peroxide (Keratolux, Allerseb-T, Oxydex, BenzoylPlus) are recommended twice weekly. These are typically available from your vet.
  • Humectants may be used after shampooing to prevent excessive drying of the skin.
  • Benzoyl peroxide gel can be applied to affected skin every 24 hours if the lesions are severe enough
  • Alternate-day wiping with various human acne products, Listerine or alcohol loosens and dissolves the comedones

2. Other conditions should be ruled out, though, such as Demodex, fungal infections or fleabite hypersensitivity which is why I asked about any additional testing done by your vet. A skin scraping should easily determine if Demodex are present; a fungal culture should rule out this sort of infection.

Ruling out a flea bite dermatitis may be more difficult but often the lack of response to steroids could help confirm it.

It would take a skin biopsy to confirm Schnauzer Comedone Syndrome but if other conditions have been ruled out, then more than likely #1 will be the problem.

Certainly fish oil supplements may help but they can take several weeks to be effective. I don't know if probiotics such as Forti Flora would be helpful or not but they can help to strengthen the immune system (they aren't just for gastrointestinal issues).

I hope this helps to at least provide possible explanations for his skin problem. Deb

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