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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 16154
Experience:  Hello, I am a small animal veterinarian and am happy to discuss any concerns & questions you have on any species.
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5 months ago i had a puppy for5days then it died. First sign

Customer Question

5 months ago i had a puppy for5days then it died. First sign vomit. Now i have a new puppy 5th day he wakes up throwing up white foam won't eat or drink is there something that could be in my house?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Dog Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.

Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you with your wee one today.

It is possible for some viral and bacterial GI agents to survive in the environment for months, so that could be a risk. That said, we cannot rule out other causes for vomiting unrelated to the previous lost pup. And in that case, we'd need to be considering infectious gastroenteritis but also parasites, dietary indiscretion, and ingestion of something harmful (toxic or non-edible).

Now in Sebastian's situation, we are going to need to tread with care. If he is vomiting but not taking in water, he is at high risk of dehydration. And if he is too nauseous to drink, he may need injectable anti-vomiting treatment from his vet to get him settled. Otherwise, in the meantime, you can try treating with an antacid. There are a number of antacids that are available over the counter and pet friendly. I would advise only treating with one, but the two I tend to use are: Pepcid(More Info/Dose @ http://www.petplace.com/article/drug-library/library/over-the-counter/famotidine-pepcid)or Zantac (More Info/Dose @ http://www.petplace.com/article/drug-library/library/over-the-counter/ranitidine-hcl-zantac). These are usually given 20 minutes before offering food (to allow absorption)and of course you want to double check with your vet before use if your wee one has any pre-existing health issues or is on any medications you haven't mentioned.

If he can keep this down and is more settled afterwards, you can then try a light diet. Examples of an easily digestible diet include cooked white rice with boiled chicken, boiled white fish, scrambled egg, or meat baby food (as long as its free from garlic or onion powder). Ideally, we want to offer this as small frequent meals to keep the stomach settled.

Overall, it is possible that this could be the same infectious agent that targeted your last pup. Otherwise, we can see these signs related to other agents. Therefore, in either case, we need to be tread with care and be proactive. Because the sooner we can settle the vomiting, the sooner we can head off dehydration and the sooner we can get him eating and drinking again.

I hope this information is helpful.

If you need any additional information, do not hesitate to ask!

All the best,

Dr. B.

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If you have any other questions, please ask me – I’ll be happy to respond. Please remember to rate my service once you have all the information you need as this is how I am credited for assisting you today.Thank you! : )

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
What are the infectous possibilities? The pup that died tested neg for parvo
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.

Hi again,

Even with Parvo removed from your differential list there will be other viral concerns like coronavirus, rotavirus, distemper, herpes, among others. As well, bacterial induced gastroenteritis can be triggered by a slew of pathogenic bacteria with Clostridia, Pasteurella, E.coli, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and a slew of others (which is why culture is so important in ongoing cases due to the sheer volume of agents that may require different treatments to clear. But in any case, the most important step here for this little one who is unwell now is symptomatic care to address his nausea, stop his vomiting, and get him settled before he dehydrates and weakens.

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Take care,

Dr. B.

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If you have any other questions, please ask me – I’ll be happy to respond. Please remember to rate my service once you have all the information you need as this is how I am credited for assisting you today. Thank you! : )