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Dr. Gary
Dr. Gary, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 19331
Experience:  DVM, Emergency Veterinarian, BS (Physiology)
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My dog is 10-11 years old and was not spayed. She has only

Customer Question

My dog is 10-11 years old and was not spayed. She has only been in heat 3 times that I know of. This time she has been spotting and also panting,it is not really hot here yet and has a loss of appetite. What can I do to make life more comfortable for her and what are some of the symtons of heat...Penny
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Dog Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. Gary replied 1 year ago.
Hello, I'm Dr Gary. I've been practicing veterinary medicine since 2007. I look forward to helping with your questions/ concerns.
When a dog is in heat, they do not typically run a fever or lose their appetite. Those signs make me worry that she may actually have a pyometra (infection in the uterus) vs a heat cycle.
If this is a pyometra, these dogs get very sick quite rapidly. They will have a discharge from the vulva. It can be white, yellow or bloody. They will also often times run a fever and have increased thirst/ urination. As it progresses, they can lose their appetite, vomit and eventually become septic and die. This can all happen in a matter of a few days.
I would get her evaluated by a vet and get either x-rays or ultrasound to rule out pyometra. As long as it's ruled out, some anti-inflammatory meds may help make her more comfortable.
Here is a nice write up on Pyometra in dogs to read over as well:
http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=603
I hope this helps, let me know if you have any other questions.