How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dr. Scarlett Your Own Question
Dr. Scarlett
Dr. Scarlett, Dog Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 4110
Experience:  I am a practicing small animal veterinarian with 18 years experience.
13866827
Type Your Dog Veterinary Question Here...
Dr. Scarlett is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Ive tried doing my own research, but every case on this seems

This answer was rated:

I've tried doing my own research, but every case on this seems to vary slightly, so:

My dog semi-randomly throws up. It's usually in the wee hours of the morning, perfect time to wake me up. Sometimes he throws up food, sometimes it's just yellow mucus-y bile. He has a slight ear infection, we have a solution we put in his ears every few days. (The last doctor said it barely showed up on the microscopy, but I prefer to clean them every day because if I wait three, he'll be shaking his head, holding it to the side, and when I clean it I'll get a lot more purple-black gunk than normal. Not blobs, but it definitely shows up on the paper towel. )
He's almost 12, and we make sure to feed him well--I'd read ahead of time that when changing your dog's food, you need to mix it with the old one to prevent stomach upset, so we've always done that. (He's on a food he's used to right now, but I mention it because dog food itself has never been the issue.) We don't feed him table scraps--again, read up on things dogs can eat, so OCCASIONALLY (rarely) he gets a carrot, blueberries, maybe a piece of meat, but it doesn't seem correlated. There is no cause-and-effect--oh, he ate that so now he's throwing up. As said before, it seems random.
He does have access to a garden we put compost on, but it's the same thing--we don't babysit him, but we do try to keep him from eating it, and the corollary doesn't seem strong.

I did read that sometimes, going without food for long periods of time can cause this, and he spends long bouts of time with me in my room, away from his food bowl. We let him eat on his own schedule, and he often eats when we do or after coming inside after a walk. I plan to try to monitor his food a bit more, make sure he eats regularly--but I wanted a professional opinon.

This has been going on for at least five years off and on. No vet has been able to tell us what the problem is specifically--just, "maybe it's something he ate"--and he seems fine immediately before and after the retching, very happy and playful. (Today he actually looked up, bile still hanging from his mouth, and took a flying leap after a squirrel. Then he pooped. It looks normal.) The retching can go on for hours--there've been times when I gave up, left him in an area I didn't mind cleaning up, and went back to bed because I didn't know how long it would last. (He hates throwing up, so often he'll start by making sounds in the back of his throat and trying to drink water. That's decreased lately--I think he's accepted that it's best to just go outside and get it over with.) It's also common for him to throw up two, three times, or for him to throw up and then just make retching noises for a long time before he actually does it again.

He has a fairly low stress environment, unless you count the occasional vacation and the mailman. Run of the mill suburban household, not a ton going on but he gets excited about the little things (as dogs do). The retching also does not increase when he seems stressed out, although he has gotten carsick once as a puppy and still seems anxious when we have to take him anywhere.

Sorry for such a long message; I'm trying to answer as many possible questions as I can. He's in good shape, you can only tell that he's slowed down if you knew him when he was younger, and it's little things, like he's not as eager to jump really high anymore. Border Collie/Blue Heeler mix, so he's aging gracefully.

Dr. Scarlett :

Hi,

Dr. Scarlett :

Intermittent vomiting can be tough. So it sounds like the vomiting occurs early in the morning, possibly when he hasn't eaten for many hours?

Dr. Scarlett :

Are his stools normal?

Dr. Scarlett :

Has he had any bloodwork done?

Dr. Scarlett :

Have you tried anything--diet changes, meds, etc?

Customer:

His stools seem normal. He had some blood taken last vet visit to check for heartworm, and it came back clean.

Customer:

We've changed his food at least once, hasn't made a difference. We're holistic.

Dr. Scarlett :

At his age, it would be worthwhile to have full bloodwork done--a complete blood count, chemistries, and thyroid (T4) level, to look for any underlying issues. There may not be, since this has been going on for awhile, but there might be something else brewing and it would be good to find it early.

Dr. Scarlett :

It sounds like you've read about Addison's disease, since you mentioned he didn't seem any worse when stressed. Addison's can certainly cause intermittent vomiting, but after 5 years and no worsening with stress, it does seem less likely.

Customer:

I actually haven't heard of Addison's disease, I was just noting his behavior.

Dr. Scarlett :

I would be thinking about delayed gastric emptying, where food stays in the stomach much longer than it should. Vomiting is the predominant sign associated with delayed gastric emptying. Although vomiting may occur at any interval following a meal, it is easier to suspect delayed gastric emptying if the vomiting occurs > 12-16 hrs after ingestion. A normal stomach is empty of a meal in approximately 6 to 10 hours (depending on species and meal content).

Dr. Scarlett :

Sometimes there is a "mechanical" obstruction (like a polyp or tumor), or a defect in propulsion--the intestines don't move food through very effectively.

Dr. Scarlett :

Sometimes adding in something like Reglan (metoclopramide) can help as this medication helps the intestines move things more effectively.

Dr. Scarlett :

Inflammatory bowel disease can cause intermittent vomiting +/- diarrhea.

Customer:

Interesting. Thanks for this, I have to convince my mother because she's the one paying the vet bill. I'll see if I can talk to the vet, and I'll try adjusting his food in the meantime.

Dr. Scarlett :

Sometimes feeding a "novel protein" diet exclusively can help. This would be something completely different from what Bear has ever eaten--something like venison & potato or whitefish & potato. Exclusively means NO treats, NO other food, NO table foods, etc.

Dr. Scarlett :

Feeding small, frequent meals can also help. Maybe meal feed him, rather than just leaving the food down.

Dr. Scarlett :

I'd probably start with the metoclopramide (which isn't terribly expensive), since he otherwise seems to be feeling fine.

Customer:

Okay, thanks!

Dr. Scarlett :

Good luck1

Customer:

This was helpful.

Dr. Scarlett and 4 other Dog Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you
Hi,

I'm just following up on our conversation about Bear. How is everything going?

Dr. Scarlett