How JustAnswer Works:

  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.

Ask Kristen McMahon Your Own Question

Kristen McMahon
Kristen McMahon, Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 182
Experience:  2001 VMD from University of Pennsylvania, 2007 Advanced Course in Veterinary Homeopathy
21152729
Type Your Dog Veterinary Question Here...
Kristen McMahon is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

My dogs eye is red and swollen in the inner corner. What should I do

Resolved Question:

My dog's eye is red and swollen in the inner corner. What should I do?
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Dog Veterinary
Expert:  Kristen McMahon replied 3 years ago.

Kristen McMahon : Hello, I'm one of the veterinarians here at Just Answer. I'd be happy to help you with Sadie.
Kristen McMahon : I'm not sure if there is inflammation or a problem called "cherry eye." if you are able to take a picture and attach it please feel free to do so.
Customer:

Thank you. What additional info do you need?

Kristen McMahon : If the problem is inflammation, you can flush her eye with some saline. This is the stuff that most contact lens wearers use and you can get it over the counter at any pharmacy.
Kristen McMahon : After flushing the eye to remove any potential debris, you can try putting a drop of Visine into the eye two to three times per day.
Customer:

I'm sorry, I'm not at home and don't have a camera. This is the second time it's happened and both times it went away, but I was wondering if I could use something to wash it out with visine?

Customer:

Looks like you just answered that

Kristen McMahon : I'm going to see if I can find a picture of a cherry eye to send to you. If that is what she has the only way to correct that problem is surgery.
Customer:

ok

Kristen McMahon : If it has come and gone, it probably isn't a cherry eye, however, mild cases can resolve on their own. Hold on a moment while I see if I can find some information/photos for you.
Kristen McMahon :
























THE PET HEALTH LIBRARY
By Wendy C. Brooks, DVM, DipABVP
Educational Director, VeterinaryPartner.com


Cherry Eye

 


Prolapse of the Tear Gland of the Third Eyelid























[IMAGE][SRC][/SRC][ALT][/ALT][WIDTH]127.89115646258503[/WIDTH][HEIGHT]100[/HEIGHT][STYLE][/STYLE][/IMAGE]



 


The normal canine eye receives its tear film from two lacrimal (tear-producing) glands. One gland is located above the eye, and the other is found within the animal's third eyelid. The gland of the third eyelid contributes a significant portion of secretion to the tear film.


In the smaller breeds -- especially Boston terriers, Cocker spaniels, bulldogs and beagles -- the gland of the third eyelid is not strongly held in place. The gland prolapses (slips out) to where the owner notices it as a reddened mass. Out of its normal position, the gland does not circulate blood properly and may swell.


Treatment - Removal of the Gland


Historically, the prolapsed gland was treated like a small tumor and was simply removed. That was before the full significance of the gland was realized.


If the third eyelid's tear gland is removed, it cannot be put back in place. If the other tear gland (the one above the eye) cannot supply adequate tears, which is not an uncommon phenomenon in older small breed dogs, then the eye becomes dry and uncomfortable. A thick yellow discharge results and the eye develops a blinding pigment covering for protection. This condition is called simply dry eye, or more scientifically keratoconjunctivitis sicca, and daily medical treatment is required to keep the eye both comfortable and visual. Not only is dry eye uncomfortable for the pet, its treatment is often frustrating and time-consuming and there is expense involved. We would like the dog to maintain the greatest amount of tear producing tissue possible, thus removing the gland for cosmetic reasons is not an acceptable treatment method.


Treatment - Replacing the Gland


The only acceptable treatment of cherry eye is replacement of the gland in its proper location. There are two techniques for doing this. The traditional tucking method is probably most commonly performed. Here, a single stitch is permanently placed that draws the gland back where it belongs. Complications are uncommon but be aware of the following possibilities:



  • If the stitch unties, the surface of the eye could become scratched by the suture. If this occurs, the eye will become suddenly painful and the suture thread may be visible. The suture can be removed and the problem solved.

  • The tuck may not be anchored well enough to hold permanently. In fact, this surgery is notorious for this type of failure and frequently a second tuck is needed. If this occurs, we recommend that a board certified ophthalmologist perform the second surgery to maximize the chances of permanent resolution.

  • Sometimes cherry eye is accompanied by other eyelid problems that make the repair more difficult or less likely to succeed. In these cases, again, if the simple surgery is not adequate, we recommend that a veterinary ophthalmologist perform the second surgery to maximize the chances of a permanent resolution.


In a newer surgical technique, a wedge of tissue is removed from directly over the actual gland. This technique is more challenging as it is not easy to determine how much tissue to remove. Tiny stitches that will eventually dissolve are used to close the gap so that the tightening of the incision margins pushes the gland back in place. Complications may include:



  • Inflammation or swelling as the stitches dissolve.

  • Inadequate tightening of the tissue gap may lead to recurrence of the cherry eye. As mentioned, if the surgery fails, a veterinary ophthalmologist should perform the second surgery.

  • Failure of the stitches to hold and associated discomfort. Loose stitches could injure the eye depending on the type of suture used.


Sometimes both surgical techniques are used in the same eye to achieve a good replacement. Harmful complications from cherry eye surgery are unusual but recurrence of the cherry eye is common. If a cherry eye recurs, it is important to let your veterinarian know so that a second surgery either with your normal veterinarian or with an ophthalmology specialist can be planned. An owner should expect some postoperative swelling after cherry eye repair but this should resolve and the eye should be comfortable and normal in appearance after about a week. If the eye appears suddenly painful or unusual in appearance, it is important that it be rechecked as soon as possible.




 

Kristen McMahon :

The picture didn't show up - let me try that part again.

Kristen McMahon :

Full Size Image

Kristen McMahon :

If you have any other questions for me please let me know - I'm here to help. And if you were happy with our chat, clicking on accept would be much appreciated.

Kristen McMahon, Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 182
Experience: 2001 VMD from University of Pennsylvania, 2007 Advanced Course in Veterinary Homeopathy
Kristen McMahon and 2 other Dog Veterinary Specialists are ready to help you

JustAnswer in the News:

 
 
 
Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.
 
 
 

What Customers are Saying:

 
 
 
  • It was so professional, so personally concerned (as we were) and you answered all of our questions. George and I are so happy that I found "JustAnswer" on my Google search -- you are now in my "Favorites" list! And, yes we do love our kitty - she makes our life complete! Bev & George Boca Raton, FL
< Last | Next >
  • It was so professional, so personally concerned (as we were) and you answered all of our questions. George and I are so happy that I found "JustAnswer" on my Google search -- you are now in my "Favorites" list! And, yes we do love our kitty - she makes our life complete! Bev & George Boca Raton, FL
  • Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help. Mary C. Freshfield, Liverpool, UK
  • This expert is wonderful. They truly know what they are talking about, and they actually care about you. They really helped put my nerves at ease. Thank you so much!!!! Alex Los Angeles, CA
  • Thank you for all your help. It is nice to know that this service is here for people like myself, who need answers fast and are not sure who to consult. GP Hesperia, CA
  • I couldn't be more satisfied! This is the site I will always come to when I need a second opinion. Justin Kernersville, NC
  • Just let me say that this encounter has been entirely professional and most helpful. I liked that I could ask additional questions and get answered in a very short turn around. Esther Woodstock, NY
  • Thank you so much for taking your time and knowledge to support my concerns. Not only did you answer my questions, you even took it a step further with replying with more pertinent information I needed to know. Robin Elkton, Maryland
 
 
 

Meet The Experts:

 
 
 
  • Dr. Debbie

    Dog Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    902
    Companion animal veterinarian practicing for over 10 years.
< Last | Next >
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/DE/debkatreyn/2011-11-28_33650_682e.64x64.jpg Dr. Debbie's Avatar

    Dr. Debbie

    Dog Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    902
    Companion animal veterinarian practicing for over 10 years.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/VE/vetforyou/2012-6-20_33122_PearlPhoto.64x64.jpg Dr. Andy's Avatar

    Dr. Andy

    Medical Director

    Satisfied Customers:

    13796
    UC Davis graduate, emphasis in dermatology, internal medicine, pain management
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/doggfone1/2009-07-16_133633_vet_pic.jpg Dr. Scott's Avatar

    Dr. Scott

    Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    9550
    12 years of small animal, equine and pocket pet medicine and surgery.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/RY/rydergar/2012-6-6_192240_IMG0328.64x64.JPG Dr. Gary's Avatar

    Dr. Gary

    Dog Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    7758
    DVM, Emergency Veterinarian, BS (Physiology)
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/AN/andrewDVM/2012-4-27_12585_iStock000011751407XSmall.64x64.jpg Dr. Drew's Avatar

    Dr. Drew

    Dog Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    6598
    Small Animal Medicine and Surgery
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/1I/1ISUDVM/2011-3-1_22028_Honeymoon2005075294928803490646858.64x64.jpg Dr. Bruce's Avatar

    Dr. Bruce

    Veterinarian

    Satisfied Customers:

    6377
    13 years of experience as a small animal veterinarian
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/BI/bigislandvet/2013-2-21_214244_IMG0357.64x64.JPG Dr. Michael Salkin's Avatar

    Dr. Michael Salkin

    Big Island Vet

    Satisfied Customers:

    6049
    University of California at Davis graduate veterinarian with 41 yrs. of experience.
 
 
 
Chat Now With A Dog Veterinarian
Kristen McMahon
Kristen McMahon
Associate Veterinarian
180 Satisfied Customers
2001 VMD from University of Pennsylvania, 2007 Advanced Course in Veterinary Homeopathy