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Denise Colgrove
Denise Colgrove, Veterinarian
Category: Dog Veterinary
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Experience:  Internship and residency at UCD, 47 years experience.
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My puppy may have eaten elmers wood glue - it says non toxic,

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My puppy may have eaten elmer's wood glue - it says non toxic, but she is acting "dopey" and not walking well. I have felt around every inch of her body looking for an injury but she doesn't seem to have one. No one actually saw her eat the wood glue. The kids spilled a large amount of it and we saw some on her paws that I assume she may have licked or that she may have actually eaten the glue (since she is acting so odd). She is a 10 week old doxie who weight 3.4 lbs
Hi there,

How long ago might she have eaten the glue?
Customer: replied 5 years ago.

2 or 3 hours - she is acting more like herself at this time, but still a little slow. We aren't 100% sure she ate the glue but she was acting weird and "drunk" for up until the last 30 minutes or so. She has urinated, but not had a bm - she had her usual morning bm before all of this happened so I don't expect her to go. There has been no vomitting or wretching

 

She is probably fine then, but I will send you a treatise on the kind of glues that cause a problem and what the symptoms and treatment are for future reference.

Gorilla Glue
Last updated on 2/10/2006.

Contributors:
Linda G. Shell, DVM, DACVIM (Neurology)

Disease description:
Certain glues (Gorilla Brand Premium Glue, Elmer's Probond) have diphenylmethane diisocyanate as the active ingredient. This substance foams after being exposed to moisture. If ingested in its liquid form, it can expand to many times its original volume, creating a "foam-like" foreign body, which can cause gastric or esophageal obstructions and mucosal erosions (figure 1). 3 The formation of the foreign body is thought to be within minutes of ingestion; therefore induction of emesis is usually not recommended because it could cause a foreign body to form in the esophagus which will be more difficult to remove than one in the stomach.

Sources of exposure include ingestion of the product container, recently spilled glue, and fresh glue on paper towels or other items. Licking very small amounts of the product may not result in foreign body formation/obstruction; however mild, transient gastrointestinal signs may occur. Ingestion of amounts large enough to form a foreign body (remember that the chemical expands 3-4 x when it is comes in contact with gastric fluid) often produces vomition, hematemesis, abdominal distension, pain, anorexia, and lethargy anywhere from 15 minutes to 20 hours after exposure. Such signs are likely to persist until surgery is done to remove the foreign body, which can sometimes be detected on abdominal palpation and usually observed on abdominal radiographs (see figure 2). Gastric ulceration and rupture was reported in one case when the glue was not removed from the stomach within several days of ingestion. 3

Clinical findings:
Abdominal distension
Abdominal mass
Abdominal pain
ANOREXIA, HYPOREXIA
ANXIETY
Cachexia, weight loss
Hematemesis
Hyperventilation, tachypnea
Malaise
Nausea
PAIN
VOMITING
ZZZ INDEX ZZZ

Diagnostic procedures: Diagnostic results:
None

Images:

You may click on the image to view a larger version

Stomach cast surgically removed from the stomach of a dog who ingested Gorilla Glue!
Click to view larger image
The glue expands quickly once it comes in contact with gastric liquids, resulting in a stomach foreign body. Usually the glue can't leave the pylorus before expansion occurs although in this case, some of the glue made it to the pyloric area!
Abdominal radiograph using barium to outline the large stomach foreign body caused by ingestion of gorilla glue.
Click to view larger image
This dog did pass a few pieces of glue in its stool after surgery.


Treatment/Management/Prevention:
SPECIFIC
1)In many cases, a gastrotomy with removal of the "cyano-bezoar" is required, because the hard foam foreign-body is non-digestible, and can obstruct gastric outflow.

2) Ingesting very small amounts of the product may not result in foreign body formation/obstruction but mild, transient gastrointestinal signs may occur and can be treated accordingly.

3) Inducing vomiting is usually not recommended since the glue may become lodged in the esophagus or could potentially be aspirated into the lungs.

4) Anecdotal reports of attempts to bulk the diet to push the glue through the gastrointestinal tract with a bulking agent have mostly been unsuccessful. In most cases, the bulking agent or the food becomes trapped in the glue formation instead of assisting in pushing the foreign body through.

Differential Diagnosis:

References:

1) Horstman CL, Eubig PA, Cornell KK, et al: Gastric outflow obstruction after ingestion of wood glue in a dog. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2003 Vol 39 (1) pp. 47-51.
2) Lubich C, Mrvos R, Krenzelok EP : Beware of canine Gorilla Glue ingestions. Vet Hum Toxicol 2004 Vol 46 (3) pp. 153-4.
3) Bailey T: The Expanding Threat of Polyurethane Adhesive Ingestion. Vet Tech 2004.

Feedback:
If you note any error or omission or if you know of any new information, please send your feedback to [email protected].
If you have any questions about a specific case or about this disease, please post your inquiry to the appropriate message boards on VIN.

 

 

Address (URL): http://www.vin.com/Members/Associate/Associate.plx?DiseaseId=2719

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Customer: replied 5 years ago.
all of that info is about garilla glue - not the same ingredients. What should I look for as when I need to take her to an after hours animal hospital?
If you read it it says Elmer's Bond glue also So if you could tell me the major ingredient, if Diphenylmethane disocyanate that is the problem causer, so if that isnot in there then it is non toxic as they say on the label and you do not have to worry about it.
Customer: replied 5 years ago.
Elmers Carpenter's Woodglue - If you can believe it - there is not an ingredient list he even though the bottle is unharmed and the label is fully intact. It IS the non toxic version made by elmer's. We have small children so we always opt for non toxic when posiible, but does that mean that it is also non toxic for pets? That is my big concern since chocolate is supposedly toxic to pets but not children.
Yes, I get you. Yes it is non toxic for pets too.
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