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Mark Bornfeld, DDS
Mark Bornfeld, DDS, Dentist
Category: Dental
Satisfied Customers: 6014
Experience:  Clinical instructor, NYU College of Dentistry; 37 years private practice experience in general dentistry, member Academy of General Dentistry, ADA
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White bumps - inside of the gums

Resolved Question:

I have white bumps on the inside of my gums and they hurt when
I wear my bottom bridge work.
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Dental
Expert:  Dr. Chip replied 5 years ago.
Can you further describe these bumps and did you dentist have any comments about them?
Expert:  Mark Bornfeld, DDS replied 5 years ago.
Welcome to JustAnswer, and thank you for putting your trust in me!

Would you be able to provide a photograph of the involved area? You may use the "paper clip" icon on the text entry form toolbar to upload a digital picture. Alternatively, you may send your picture to a photo hosting site, such as Flickr or Photobucket, and provide a link to the picture in a reply to this information request. This will allow me to provide a more accurate and relevant response...
Customer: replied 5 years ago.
The white bumps are rather hard. There re two on the bottom inside of my gum (one on the front left and one on the front right). They only hurt when I put my bridgework in. And yes I did go to my dentist who made adjustments to my bridgework but really made no comments that were helpful to eliminating them. He said they were kind of like "bunions" that you get on your feet. ???? I suppose I should have questioned further but I didn't. Do you have any ideas about how to handle this situation?
Customer: replied 5 years ago.
I will see if my husband can take a good digital photo and get back to you ASAP
Expert:  Mark Bornfeld, DDS replied 5 years ago.

Do your bumps look anything like this?

Customer: replied 5 years ago.
My husband took two photos -- how do I send them to you?
Expert:  Mark Bornfeld, DDS replied 5 years ago.
You may use the "paper clip" icon on the text entry form toolbar to upload a digital picture. Alternatively, you may send your picture to a photo hosting site, such as Flickr or Photobucket, and provide a link to the picture in a reply to this information request.
Customer: replied 5 years ago.

Right side below - The one on the left is just a bit smaller

Expert:  replied 5 years ago.
If the bump to which you refer is the bony prominence immediately above the "star" , this is a formation known as a "torus mandibularis". This is a normal anatomic variant, and is the result of a growth of normal bone that extends beyond the usual contours. About 20% of people have either mandibular tori or palatal tori (on the roof of the mouth).

Torus mandibularis, because it is a normal variant, does not usually require any treatment. However, as you have already discovered, they can interfere with the comfort of a partial denture. This issue usually only happens when the tori get quite large, as they sometimes do-- see:

Your tori do not appear to be sufficiently large to warrant surgical removal. However, your partial denture may require modification or replacement to permit comfort. It is customary to design a lower partial denture with "relief"-- a small gap between the bar or denture base in the front and the tissues immediately behind the lower front teeth, to eliminate pressure between the denture and the thin tissues in this location. Your denture may be old, and may have settled into your torus, and the pressure between the denture and this bony lump can cause a pressure ulcer to occur. Your dentist may be able to grind off a sufficient amount of material at the place of tissue pressure to allow you to wear your denture comfortably. If not, your dentist may need to construct a new denture with additional relief in the problematic area to prevent tissue compression and allow comfort.

Hope this helps. If my answer has been helpful, please remember to click "accept".
Good luck!
Mark Bornfeld, DDS, Dentist
Category: Dental
Satisfied Customers: 6014
Experience: Clinical instructor, NYU College of Dentistry; 37 years private practice experience in general dentistry, member Academy of General Dentistry, ADA
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