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Legal-Kal, Criminal Defense Lawyer
Category: Criminal Law
Satisfied Customers: 544
Experience:  Attorney at Law Offices of Khaled Issa
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Statue of limitations brutality in texas or under federal

Customer Question

Statue of limitations for police brutality in texas or under federal law?
JA: Since laws vary from place to place, what state is this in? And when did this happen?
Customer: Texas. case against accused was dismissed February 2013.
JA: Have you consulted a lawyer yet?
Customer: Just asking?
JA: Please give me a bit more information, so we can help you best.
Customer: Arrest June 2012. Case dismissed February 2013. When is statue of limitations?
JA: Is there anything else important you think the Lawyer should know?
Customer: Under federal law and Texas law, what is your understanding of the statue of limitations. DA dismissed under interest of justice and refused to accept charges. Charges were bogus and defendants got the beat down.
JA: OK. Got it. I'm sending you to a secure page on JustAnswer so you can place the $5 fully-refundable deposit now. While you're filling out that form, I'll tell the Lawyer about your situation and then connect you two.
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Criminal Law
Expert:  Legal-Kal replied 5 months ago.
Good afternoon: My name is ***** ***** I would be happy to provide general information regarding your question. A case of "police brutality," legally known as excessive force falls under federal jurisdiction. The federal law that covers excessive force is 42 U.S.C. 1983. Under Section 1983, there is no "per se" statute of limitations. However, Section 1983 is classified as "deficient" for statute of limitations. This means that the federal law "defers" to the state law regarding the statute of limitations. Because Section 1983 claims fall under "personal injury," this means that the federal law regarding excessive force is governed by the state law pertaining to statute of limitations. Because the Texas personal injury statute of limitations for personal injury is 2 years, this means that the federal action for excessive force is 2 years. Any questions based on this? If so, please ask and I would be happy to assist further or provide clarification on anything I have provided here. If not, please remember that experts here are not employees of JustAnswer and do not get credited for assisting individuals with their question until the individual clicks ACCEPT and rates the assistance provided. Your cooperation in this regard would be appreciated! Thank you!
Expert:  Legal-Kal replied 5 months ago.
I see you have read my response to your question. If you have questions based on my response, please ask. If not, do not forget to click ACCEPT and rate the assistance. This will ensure future assistance from experts if you have future questions.
Expert:  Legal-Kal replied 5 months ago.
Questions? If so, please ask. If not, please remember that experts here assist individuals not as a hobby, but as their source of income. Please remember to comply with the Terms of Service agreed upon by you by clicking ACCEPT and rating the assistance.
Expert:  Legal-Kal replied 5 months ago.
Did you not intend to comply with the agreement? Looks like I answered your question.
Expert:  Legal-Kal replied 5 months ago.
Expert:  Legal-Kal replied 5 months ago.

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